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Old 06-30-2006, 03:55 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Any bicycle riders?

Is it worth spending 300-500 on a bike rather than a 200 dollar mountain bike?

How does cycling make you feel?
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Old 06-30-2006, 04:54 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Location: S.E. PA in U Sofa
I'm not a hardcore cyclist, but I suppose how much you decide to spend depends on what you want ...not to mention what you can afford. Weight seems inversely proportional to price and I like reasonably light weight but strong and reliable. I think the smooth, reliable shifters, brakes etc. all cost more than cheapo stuff.

Since I got a really good deal at the bike shop where my daughter is a mechanic (but still well over $300), I ended up buying a "middle of the road" Marin Fairfax bike last year that I still very much really enjoy riding, but it's a road bike not a mountain bike. The Marin mountain bikes I tried also seemed very well done.

I ride mostly alone except when I ride with my kids. When I'm with them, I feel like a parent watching over them but I still enjoy the rides and we have lots of fun exploring trails and back roads. When I'm cycling alone, it makes me feel serene and independent, my brain seems to engage in a different gear with different thought patterns when I ride alone and I like it.
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Old 06-30-2006, 05:37 AM   #3 (permalink)
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I'm a beginning rider, and I got a Trek 3500 for about $200. It's about the best bike you'll get for the money, and it's easily upgradable. I decided that it wasn't worth spending $400+ on a bike until I saw how often I used it, what kind of biking I tended to do (street vs. off-road), what kind of features might be good for me, etc. I love biking - it makes me feel healthy. And I'm going to start using it instead of my car for small trips where it makes sense.

If the bike is going to be your primary mode of transportation, splurge on one with the features that are going to make you happy, comfortable, and safe. If you're just using it for recreation or casual exercise, go with something cheaper until you decide whether you want to invest in something for a more focused purpose.
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Old 06-30-2006, 05:48 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Spend the money, go to your local bike shop and get a decent bike. The differences between them and a wal-mart bike are worlds apart. First off the bike will be assembled by somebody who knows what they're doing, not the kid with a crescent wrench who is a sophomore in high school and has to finish that bike before he can go home on a friday night. Second, new cables stretch...it's a fact, they just do. Typically your local bike shop will do your first tune up on a bike you bought from them for free. Who's going to tune up your wal-mart bike? Third, what happens when you break or wear out parts?
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Old 06-30-2006, 06:15 AM   #5 (permalink)
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You can get a decent bike at your local shop without spending tons of money. But i do agree with cj2112 - go to a shop and not to WalMart or Target. They'll let you ride the bikes around, give you advice, and that free tune-up is a good thing.
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Old 06-30-2006, 06:17 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Shit, I bought a beach cruiser for $25.

Easily upgradeable with streamers and a bell.
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Old 06-30-2006, 08:08 AM   #7 (permalink)
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If you're concerned about the money factor, see if there's a local bike co-op in your city. (you can check google and type in 'bike co-op' with the city name). They often have cheap bikes (the quality of them vary, but they're repaired pretty well, depending on the place). The co-ops also usually have workshops if you'd like to get more knowledge with bicycles and bike repair as well.

I have a couple bikes (both of them are from garage sales) but I'm pretty frustrated that I've have not been able to ride for a month or so, ecause both of them are in need of good repair.
One needs both innertubes replaced and the other, the bar holding the pedals in place is shot (I may just end up replacing this bike, since it was cheap to begin with).

I love bike riding, and would like to talk about them on the TFP (I don't know if Tilted Motors is the best place to discuss it: perhaps it should be renamed 'Tilted Transportation' )

As everyone else stated, don't go to a big-box retail store for a bike. It's just not worth it and you'll be better off if you go the co-op or bike store route.

Catcha back on the flipside,
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Old 06-30-2006, 08:13 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Go to the bike shop for one, better advice and service.

Spend as much money as you can on a bike, get one thats nice and light, and suited towards the enviroment you plan to use it in most. No point getting duel suspension if you plan on only poodling around the city.
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Old 06-30-2006, 11:13 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Location: S.E. PA in U Sofa
A further concrete example of bike shop vs big discount store experience: I bought what looked like a pretty nice bike for my 8yo boy at Costco. The second day he was riding it around the playground ...on the dirt not pavement... the crank broke; crank is the part the pedals are attached to; I examined it and saw that the front sprocket was also already distorted. Two bike shops I took it to, including the sage advice of my expert bike mechanic daughter, said that it isn't even worth fixing. Fortunately, Costco has a liberal return/refund policy and took the junk back.

My lesson: forged parts on better quality bikes are more durable than stamped steel sprockets and cheap cast cranks.
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Old 06-30-2006, 03:56 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Location: upstate NY
I'd strongly suggest looking for a quality used bike in that price range. Generally bikes will lose 1/2 their value the first year they are ridden. I guarantee you that quality parts and a frame from even 5 years ago are worth more that the equipment on the current crop of $200 bicycles. Buy a used one and ride it for a year. If you take to the sport, then you can sell the used one and feel confident spending more on a new, higher end bike. If you lose interest just sell the old one again, and you probably won't be out much money in the long run.

As far as how it makes you feel, well I have trouble putting that into words. You'll have to get out and see for yourself.
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Old 06-30-2006, 04:43 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Bike shop all the way.

Another thing Bike shops offer that A Wal-Mart will not, is they MEASURE you for a bike. If your frame, seat post, handlebars, and cranks aren't the right fit, you will be VERY uncomfortable if you ride for any length of time, which only leads to you not being as interested in cycling.

I see the same thing happen when someone I know who wants to get into the internet and computers, and they go buy some $200 used computer. They hate the thing for how much it crashes, it's lack of support, and how slow it is, and they ultimately just give up on the whole idea of a computer before they have seen how it COULD be.

I am not saying go all out, but getting a bike that fits YOU, is worth double the price of the Wal-Mart bike.
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Old 07-01-2006, 07:17 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Location: OH, USA
I must say that although bike shop bikes are better than what you will find at Target and Wally World in general, this is not the rule. I have a Schwinn (Pacific) S-25 from Target that I picked up cheep, it's a great bike for the money, and has many of the same components and shifters that my wife's $300 shop bike has. I have been assembling bikes for Target and Kmart for 5 years now and I must say that most of their bikes are such shit that (even when well assembled by a knowledgable tech) will fall apart and simply never work right (especially the breaks). Pacific, however, makes several very good quality bikes in the under $200 price range. These bikes may be named Pacific, Schwinn, or Mongoose, just look near the crank for a shiny sticker on the downtube to see if it's a Pacific bike.
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Old 07-02-2006, 01:17 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carno
Shit, I bought a beach cruiser for $25.

Easily upgradeable with streamers and a bell.
Ha ha ha! That one actually made me LOL. And I NEVER laugh out loud when I'm reading stuff online.

I ride my bike 5 miles to and from work everyday over relaively flat paved streets. I'm usually able to cover 5 miles in 20 minutes (17 minutes has been my personal best - I was late :-P).

I have tried 3 different bikes. The first one was a dedicated road bike (albeit an old road bike) a Contential Schwinn. Then it was a hybrid "City Bike" made by some company in Japan (it's also old) and the most recent one was (and still is) a red mountain bike (unknown mfg).

I gotta tell you, for road biking, get an ACTUAL road bike. The Schwinn was a dream (but it got stolen) and the City Bike isn't too bad it's decent, but the red mountain bike is an ELEPHANT. It's bitch to ride!

The only good thing I can say about using a mountain bike for road work is that I get a decent leg workout. You should see the pump I get in my legs after the ride.



On another matter, I need a dedicated road bike, but I'm pretty hard on my bikes (being I pedal about 80 RPM on the hardest gear). I'm 6'2", 230 pounds (currently cutting down to 200 pounds) and my inseam is 30". Can someone reccomend me a name to bring up at the local bike shop? How about a discount internet site?

Thanks!
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Old 07-02-2006, 09:22 PM   #14 (permalink)
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cj2112 couldn't have put it better. Spend the extra money and get a quality bike. A discount store bike will only give you grief.
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Old 07-02-2006, 10:33 PM   #15 (permalink)
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I love cycling. I live in an area where anything other than my outdated piece of crap Univega Rover 305 (looks bad but runs rather well, mind you) would get stolen in a heartbeat.

It depends upon your needs. What will you be using it for? Is it your every-day transportation to work? Will you be honing your racing skills? Are you just looking for a fresh way to work out?

Go to a local independent bike shop. Ask what the benefits are of each major bike style: Road, mountain, cruiser...

Figure out what is best for you, and the area you live in. If you'll be riding up a lot of hills, you're not going to want a cruiser. Do your research.

The best generic advice that I can think of is to pick up the bike, feel its weight. Could you sling it over your shoulder and walk 100+ paces? How about up and down a staircase? Go for an aluminum frame, and be sure you get quality shifters, derailers, and the tools you need to fix it on the fly.

DON'T PURCHASE A BICYLE FROM:
Costco
Toys R Us
Target
Wal-Mart
Play it Again Sports
Salvation Army/ Good Will / local swapmeet

You CAN purchase inexpensive bicycles at quality independent bicycle stores. They will be more reliable overall - and will last years longer than some sort of cheap, heavy junk from the aforementioned retailers. Also, most of the independent cycle shops usually offer friendly maintenance tips, and give you a deal on repairs if you bring in one of their bikes. They also have cycling clubs, if you're looking for a regular group to train with.

oh!

it's just a trend that I've noticed, but... don't just go for the bike with the cushy-est looking seat. The bike itself is usually crap. If you find the bike of your dreams, but you want a different seat than the display, just ask.

"How does bicylcling make you feel?" -

Able to take on the world. I love racing by the cars that are just crawling along. I love laughing at the imbiciles that bring their shiny, fancy bikes, lock them up insufficiently, and expect the bike to be waiting for them when they return from 8 hours in the library. It's rewarding to ride my bike 4 miles to the grocery store, barely break a sweat, cram everything in my backpack, and get home before the folks that left with a car at the same time. I can't imagine life without a bicycle. I can't imagine it being very fun. Been riding since I was a kid, and never stopped. One can't know complete independence until they've ridden a bicycle: freedom to dart from one side of town to the other, to not be burdoned by rising fuel prices, and to start a day of work energized after a solid dose of fresh morning air.
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Old 07-03-2006, 06:47 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Location: The Woodlands, TX
I really like my bike, its a Trek 4900 alpha
think we paid about $350ish for it, had it for 4 hard years and I've only had to replace the chain and the rear sprocket (chain got crusty from being outside on the bike rack 24/7 and that caused teeth on the back gears to get bent x_X)

mainly use it for flying around campus as fast as I can... its way fun

use it for riding to friends houses and sometimes bars to...

its definently fun to fly by all the guys stuck in traffic.

I've taken it to the grocery a couple times... but I go so rarely that I need more cargo space then the bike can provide...
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Old 07-03-2006, 09:06 AM   #17 (permalink)
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I've got a Trek I got for about 200 from a sporting goods store. It's reliable and has lasted years. I ride it quite a bit, but mostly just aorund town. I don't go on any long cross country bike rides, nor am I training for the tour de minnesota.

In my opinion, you don't notice the extra quality of a real expensive model (of anything) until you've used a cheaper model for awhile. So, go for the cheaper (but not cheapest) one. If you like it, buy a nice one in a year or two. That way, if you don't like it, you won't be out much.
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Old 07-03-2006, 09:57 PM   #18 (permalink)
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i agree, if you don't really use it that often, then there's no real need to get something over the top right away. just go with a medium-ish priced mountain bike & see how you like it! trek does make great bikes - but there are plenty of brands/models to choose from. you'll be able to figure it out after you get used to riding - then you'll have a better idea of what to look for when you're ready to upgrade.

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Old 07-04-2006, 09:55 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Reading this thread I just realized I have too many bikes, well, no not really. I have a BMX for fun riding, a mountain bike for trail riding, and a touring bike for long trips and eventually getting to work.

The mountain bike was given to me by a friend and is way too tall for me. If you are going to buy a bike go to a local bike store, they will fit you properly on the bike.

I love biking, it's another means of pure freedom, being able to cover any distance, or a variety of terrain.

Enoy the ride.
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Old 07-04-2006, 10:58 PM   #20 (permalink)
 
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Location: Waterloo, Ontario
On a totally unrelated topic...

I was in a bike shop with a friend of a friend, looking at bikes, and I saw some for more than $3000! For that price, I doubt that they'd let me test ride it but I would like to 'cause I'm really curious to know what a three thousand dollar bicycle must feel like... Really, what are you getting for that kind of money?
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Old 07-05-2006, 03:46 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Location: Upper Michigan
I'm not real familiar with all the technical aspects of a quality bike versus a cheapo one BUT...
My in-laws bought me a cheapo from K-mart. It rides fine and gets me where I need to go. I ride it fairly often to just get places in town instead of driving the car. Hubby's bike is the one that we put the connections onto in order to hook up the bike trailer for the little kids.
Hubby has a very nice bike that he paid a couple hundred for from a bike shop. He has even taken it back after an accident and they checked things over and made some minor repairs and tune-ups at no charge. Because they warrentied it. That was a big benefit.

What I can definately tell you is that even those my bike is newer, has the same number of gears, and is similar in size... I can ride his bike longer and harder without getting tired. I can ride his bike up a particularly long and steap hill on the edge of town, with the trailer hooked up and full of 2 kids but I cannot make it up that same hill without stopping and walking my bike. I do not know all the particulars but the more expensive bike has a smoother ride, easier to ride, more comfortable seat, and better gearing (or whatever it is that lets me make more power without straining so hard).
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Old 07-05-2006, 03:06 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Location: upstate NY
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnifeMissile
On a totally unrelated topic...

I was in a bike shop with a friend of a friend, looking at bikes, and I saw some for more than $3000! For that price, I doubt that they'd let me test ride it but I would like to 'cause I'm really curious to know what a three thousand dollar bicycle must feel like... Really, what are you getting for that kind of money?

Good question. I've got a couple of those. In fact, when I put one of my road bikes in my old hunk of junk car, the value of the total package doubles!

I'd say most of the improvement comes when you go from $300 up to about $1000. You will get a much lighter bike, with more advanced and reliable components, and a much more comfortable ride over longer distances. If you're just riding to the local library and grocery store, it really doesn't matter much.

North of $1000 you are looking at small incremental improvements, if any, and spending increasing $$ to get that last 5% improvement in performance. Much of the time that extra money is going toward the latest trend or fad, which may look hot and be really popular, but do nothing for you as a cyclist. Some current examples would be carbon fiber seatposts, handlebars, and other carbon doo-dads. They're really meaningless in terms of performance, but they're the in thing, and people want them.

I think the best value in road bikes right now is to buy a classic lugged steel frame on EBay, and build it up with components. I realize that takes some bike knowledge and tools which may not be easily available. The frames are going for around $400 and ride like a dream....probably better than most bikes on the market for triple that price.

One final comment: Don't get a mountain bike unless you plan on mountain biking. They're heavy, inefficient, and ultimately uncomfortable for road riding, which is what many people end up doing with them.
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Old 06-26-2008, 02:52 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Does anyone use a bike bell or horn? I just dug out an old road bike from my parent's garage and am looking to see what's necessary and what I can live without. For sure I'm getting new tires, new chain, and some steel wool to get rid of surface rust. I took it to a local shop to have it tuned up/looked over, so I guess we'll see what the verdict is.

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Old 06-26-2008, 08:40 AM   #24 (permalink)
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I am an avid rider. I usually do 20-60km rides daily so I know a little bit about bikes. I am home for lunch right now and have to head back to the office so I'll post more in a bit and try and answer some questions.

One factor to consider is your lock situation. The more expensive the bike, the more someone is going to want to take it. If you plan on leaving your bike locked up somewhere for long periods of time I would suggest either investing in a good HQ lock or getting a used bike that you would not cry over losing.

I have a couple of bikes that I use for different situations. I keep a cheap jalopy around for when I ride to the library or get a few groceries.

I would suggest getting your bike at a cycle shop as suggested above. Normally you'll get much better service but again most of these shops have low profit margins so they'll try and sell you....but again state your price, main use and they'll put you in a ride that suits your needs.

If they don't measure or size you up while showing you bikes or allow you to test ride it around the block i'd try another shop.

Get a helmet too!!!! nothing more important than a helmet on kids AND adults.
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Old 06-26-2008, 09:13 AM   #25 (permalink)
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The 25 dollar bike that I got from craigslist was fine for getting around town.

Until, it got stolen a few weeks later. (Get a bike lock)
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Old 06-26-2008, 10:21 AM   #26 (permalink)
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Location: Oregon
Yes, a good lock will save you a lot of heartache. I use a Kryptonite U-lock with cable:
Amazon.com: Kryptonite KryptoLok STD with 4' Flex Cable: Sports &amp; Outdoors Amazon.com: Kryptonite KryptoLok STD with 4' Flex Cable: Sports &amp; Outdoors
The Kryptonite locks come with a guarantee (you have to fill out the paperwork) that says if your bike is stolen as a result of the lock failing, they'll replace your bike (obviously only as much as the original bike was worth).

First off, shop around. Prices vary from bike shop to bike shop, sometimes considerably. If you're going to use the bike to carry stuff at all, you'll want to consider getting a rack or panniers. If you're going to ride at night, you'll need a light for the front and a red light for the rear. You'll need a helmet. Bells are good for letting pedestrians know you're approaching; if you live in a town with a lot of pedestrian traffic I would recommend one. I just have a little dinky bell but it does the trick. If you're planning on riding any sort of distance, or riding for fitness purposes, get a cyclocomputer to track how fast you ride and how far you go. You might also consider replacing the saddle on that bike, depending on how it fits you. Having a saddle you like is important. Furthermore, learn some basic bicycle maintenance; around here Parks and Rec offers classes and so do a couple of the bike shops and the university. And lastly, get to know the bike shop guys! Find a good bike shop that you like, and get friendly. They are a great asset--use their expertise!

I love my bike, and I love riding it--it's my main mode of transportation.
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Old 06-26-2008, 04:06 PM   #27 (permalink)
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http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...slisearch=true

I haven't used my car in the past 10 days, and have put about 100 miles on my bike in that time.

I would recommend getting a speed/distance computer if you plan to ride for exercise or just for fun. Get a lock that has a way to mount to the bike frame when not in use. And wear a helmet. Don't trust your ears to hear cars at stop signs and lights, use your eyes. Get some white-lithium grease spray and use it on the moving parts. Keep your tires inflated. Stretch your legs and knees out before you ride and after you finish. And make sure the brakes are in good shape, use the back one normally and the front one (as well as the back) in emergencies. Backpacks work well for transporting stuff as well. I usually wear shorts and a t-shirt to ride, but change into work clothes in the bathroom at work when I get there.
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Old 06-26-2008, 04:12 PM   #28 (permalink)
... a sort of licensed troubleshooter.
 
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I got "spend the money" advice. I bought a used mountain bike off Craigslist for $80 2-3 years ago and it's stood up to incredible abuse without ever crapping out on me. Not only do I often take it to work and the gym, but I occasionally toss it in the back of the Eclipse and take it up into the Santa Cruz mountains for the day. All I've ever had to do was realign the rims a few times and replace the tubes all the time.

I could have been lucky, I dunno. Still, the best $80 I've ever spent.
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Old 06-26-2008, 07:10 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Where is he of the sharp edges? I know blahblah454 is a cyclist, maybe he can offer some insight. Mine is more general.

As a general rule, price is no guarantee of quality. I use my guitars as an example; some of my guitars are worth less than $200 but play like the equivalent $800 instruments. I can pull that off because I know what to look for and what to avoid.

If you don't know what to look for and what to avoid in bicycles, find someone who does. snowy's suggestion of the bike shop employees is probably a good bet.
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Old 06-26-2008, 07:17 PM   #30 (permalink)
... a sort of licensed troubleshooter.
 
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My experience with bike employees is if you're not riding a bike above $800, you're sub-human. Of course they're not all going to be snobs, but it's a possibility.
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Old 06-26-2008, 07:49 PM   #31 (permalink)
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Location: Oregon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willravel
My experience with bike employees is if you're not riding a bike above $800, you're sub-human. Of course they're not all going to be snobs, but it's a possibility.
I own a bike that cost considerably less than $800, and I've never been treated poorly by a bike shop employee in this town. Of course, I live in a town full of college students who use a variety of bikes as transport and bike enthusiasts. My roommate rides a beat-up Schwinn mountain bike, and hasn't run into any problems either--and he spends considerably more time in bike shops than I do.

Every bike shop is different; shop around and find one whose employees and prices you like.
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:26 PM   #32 (permalink)
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Mary's SO made her bike for her out of random retro parts that he collected and it is one of the nicest looking bikes I have ever seen. It probably cost about $100. However, he is a bike mech for a living. He left last Sun from VA to bike to OR. He expects he will arrive sometime in Sep. Woot!

My friend J sort of collects bikes. He says his purpose in seeking them out is for resale or to cull better parts for his own bike, but I believe he just likes collecting them. I dont believe he has ever sold one. He buys and has bikes that probably cost as little as $5, all the way up to $2500.

So, whatever bike you get, know that you can change parts out and tweak it to your liking. And be careful out there.
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:29 PM   #33 (permalink)
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Location: Oregon
Quote:
Originally Posted by girldetective
Mary's SO made her bike for her out of random retro parts that he collected and it is one of the nicest looking bikes I have ever seen. It probably cost about $100. However, he is a bike mech for a living. He left last Sun from VA to bike to OR. He expects he will arrive sometime in Sep. Woot!

My friend J sort of collects bikes. He says his purpose in seeking them out is for resale or to cull better parts for his own bike, but I believe he just likes collecting them. I dont believe he has ever sold one. He buys and has bikes that probably cost as little as $5, all the way up to $2500.

So, whatever bike you get, know that you can change parts out and tweak it to your liking. And be careful out there.
I've known a number of people around this town who have cannibalized other bikes to make new bikes. The university here sells a variety of things at surplus, including all sorts of bikes that they impound off the racks at campus for various reasons, and a friend of mine once got 10 bikes for $20 that he managed to put together into 1 working road bike.
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Old 06-28-2008, 11:59 AM   #34 (permalink)
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That old Univega is cool. Try to find a "bike kitchen" or co-op in your area. They will work on it for free if you help, basically you do most of the work with their tools under their supervision.

Since it's been sitting so long I'd suggest repacking the hubs, bottom bracket and headset. While it's apart the kitchen staff can tell you how much life is left in the bearings and races. Might as well ditch that pie-plate too, unless you like it. Without the spoke protector (useless on a correctly adjusted bike) shop employees will take you more seriously when you go to the LBS (local bike shop).

I like "dry lube" for my chains, I've been using Rock-n-Roll lube lately and love it. Wet lube lasts longer but it attracts dust here in Denver.

Learn to change a tube, ask about "the cotton ball trick" to find small things stuck in the tire and learn how to patch. Use good patches. Keep an extra tube around so you don't have to patch the tube just to go somewhere. I tie knots in the tubes that need to be patched and sit around and do them when I get a few built up.

That's really about it. Keep your chain lubed and stay out of the glass and you don't really have to spend much money on biking.

Four people, six bikes in the family. Soon to be seven bikes because the youngest just learned the joys of riding a geared bike on his moms.
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Old 06-29-2008, 03:46 PM   #35 (permalink)
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If you live in a desert area, you should get these kevlar tube inserts. They will prevent lots of flat tires (I never got one in 5 years after putting them in, but got 3 in the first 2 weeks).
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Old 06-30-2008, 05:31 PM   #36 (permalink)
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Came back from a really short ride, about 10 minutes around the neighborhood (roughly 1.5 miles, according to google maps). Thought I could take a small hill, winded the hell out of me! Felt good though, waved to everyone I saw.



New break pads, new tires (Armadillo), new handlebar wrap (Cinelli). All I need now is some stamina.
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Old 06-30-2008, 05:42 PM   #37 (permalink)
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It doesn't take very long. I've been riding a few times a week for 3 months now and 3 miles is nothing.
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Old 06-30-2008, 07:49 PM   #38 (permalink)
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Location: Boulder Baby!
i ride as much as i can. I ride into work, and periodically go for lunch time rides (12-15 miles). if you plan to ride a lot, spend the money. If you can wait, a lot of bike shops have their off season tent sales and you can get a bike at 15-30% off (which means you can get an upgrade for free almost).

and as for the cheapies on Craigslist, they work great too. But be prepared to learn how to maintain them. Not to say thats a bad thing or anything, but you could nickel and dime yourself to death quite easily.
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Old 06-30-2008, 07:59 PM   #39 (permalink)
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You'll get used to riding pretty quickly, especially if you keep at it. I can do a 10 mile ride (with hills), easy, and I never ever thought I'd be able to do that. I biked 20 miles in a day recently with a long ride for pleasure in the morning and a few shorter trips throughout the day after that. I'm kind of a chicken when it comes to testing myself, but this summer one of my goals is to push myself to take longer and longer rides.
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Old 07-24-2008, 09:19 PM   #40 (permalink)
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Woo, just got back from a 28.5 mile ride. For the past 2 weeks I've been doing 10mile rides, but this was just too much. Glad I had my 10 speeds! I'm going to collapse in a heap now.
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