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Old 01-09-2008, 09:16 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Location: Anchorage, AK
Car insurance:

So I have insurance with USAA, and so did the person that I got into the accident with. we backed up into each other. we were considered 50% fault.

So at the end i guess they called it 50% fault. they said there is no such thing as NO FAULT.

so ok thats fine. I paid my deductible. ($500) for the total damage on mine to equal about $1400. the other person was about $1500.

so my insurance has been $140/mo and then with this accident after then, they are charging me about $383!!!

is this protocol? what are the steps to choosing how much i pay. now have you, this is my first accident ever!!!!
I am single male, 24yrs old, and first accident

I mean come on.

someone in insurance help me out here. how can i get them to lower it. i mean in 6 months, i almost pay for both accidents, and technically its not my fault. she ran me. they just chose %50 fault. I had pictures to show that I was out further than her.

im heated!

I am thinking about dumping them and going to state farm. I know I can get a better rate with ONE accident. Has this happened to anyone? one accident and they pay a bunch for it?
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Old 01-09-2008, 09:42 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Call them and explain.

I did it when I had my oh-no and they'll work with you if they think they're going to lose you.
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Old 01-09-2008, 09:54 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Location: Portland Or-ah-gun
I work in the claims department for a Top 5 auto insurer and it's bullshit that no fault accidents don't exist. If you didn't have your key in the ignition and the other guy backed into you, no one would try to argue you even had partial liability.

That being said, in order to pay out of third party coverage (liability) a company will take the word of its policyholder unless there is a witness or overwhelming conflicting evidence. Think of how pissed you would have been if the other guy's car was fully covered under your 3rd party coverage. Also since the other policyholder was found 50 percent at fault, in most states you would only owe 50 percent of your deductible. Not sure if your deductible is $1000 but if you paid your full deductible you might be owed half of it back.

USAA actually has the highest customer satisfaction rates out of all the auto insurance companies so those who qualify for it usually stick with it. Of course paying 250%+ of your prior premium is outrageous so I'd consider shopping around (perhaps to my company ).
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Old 01-09-2008, 10:44 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Location: Anchorage, AK
WELL yes, I paid $500 deduct. my $deduct was $500. no half here for some reason.
good to hear that I get $250 hopefully.

well we backed into eachother, when i took pictures and sent them to them, u could clearly see that I had water marks from my exhaust further out than the other person was. had pictures to prove, but still got dealt 50%.

they are nice but thats about it. they dont ever try to save you money or offer you specials, or tell me ways how to save. its like they are only nice when i call them. they call Corporal H. instead of Mr.

well what is your company called? so I can look into it. do you have "tfp discount?" lol
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Old 01-09-2008, 11:19 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blktour
they are nice but thats about it. they dont ever try to save you money or offer you specials, or tell me ways how to save. its like they are only nice when i call them. they call Corporal H. instead of Mr.
I don't like them calling me Sergeant Crompsin. Creeps me out.

USAA saved me a quite a bit of cash on my premium by dropping some "factors" earlier than normal after a phone call and a mention of dissatisfaction. They didn't have to do that but they did it on their own, it was a casual call regarding a quote for another vehicle. They're a business and it's good business to keep customers.

*shrug*
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Old 01-09-2008, 11:23 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Hey man, welcome to the club on the outragous deductable.
My folks were officers in the Air Force and thus we have USAA for our banking and auto insurance.

Here's my dads advice...if you get into an accident DON'T CALL THE INSURANCE COMPANY UNLESS THE CAR IS TOTALED...OR you WILL be paying for a new car you don't get to drive due to your new higher insurance rate. Sorry man but since we're younger than 25 and you're a male your rates will suck. Just plain and simple. Also the higher your deductible the lower your rates. Fortunately females tend to be cheaper.

I wouldn't have even gotten them involved honestly and tried to get it fixed at a local place. My car got hit 3 times while I was living in Lubbock, probably several thousand dollars worth of cosmetic damage and my parents told me to deal with it. I'm 19 mind you. I'm driving a paid off VW Beetle also. Don't know if you're doing payments on your car...that could affect your decision get them involved too. I don't know if you're paying your own rates...but they will take forever to come down since you reported this probably.

USAA is a great bank, I wouldn't switch, a lot of people would kill to have them. Not to mention it's a true privilege and honor to have them. I think auto insurance is a necessary evil. If you total your car then it's good but if it's something minor your rates shoot through the roof and take forever to come down. I advise leaving the insurance folks out if at all possible next time (hopefully there won't be a next time), they never really help at this time in our lives. Wait till you're 40, then you might have a decent rate where they can offer help worth having.

I agree with Crompsin about the customer service. They are the best. I've never had bad customer service with them. I over drafted by a few cents one time and they refunded it and told me not to worry, of course it was my firs time. Really these guys are top of the line, don't listen to the other guy telling you to switch. You won't find better rates with another company.

Last edited by surferlove007; 01-09-2008 at 11:27 PM..
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Old 01-10-2008, 12:54 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blktour
I am single male, 24yrs old, and first accident
That's the problem right there.

Male, Under 25 and not married, what a wonderful high isurance risk demographic!
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Old 01-10-2008, 03:20 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Location: Portland Or-ah-gun
With some companies (but not mine), your rates will increase if your car was moving and a claim is filed regardless of fault. If the repairs are only a few dollars above your deductible, it might be a good idea to leave your company out. I say might because initial estimates are not always accurate because additional hidden damage is found all the time.

Also, take body shop estimates with a grain of salt. When you get an estimate, one of the first questions they ask is "Will this be Insurance Pay or Out of Pocket?" The estimate you get will vary widely depending to the answer to this question. If you say OOP, the shop will do put only the necessary items on the estimate to get your car safe again and looking decent (but not necessarily to pre-loss condition). If you reply insurance, they quote will likely be for the worst-case high point of the cost range. If there's a chance the molding trim will break when they paint your door, then it'll probably be on the estimate. So what if the trim doesn't break and the shop doesn't need to buy the part? Well, let's just say I don't think the shop will rush to look up an address to send a refund. What if there isn't extra damage behind that bumper? Well, they still get paid for labor to replace an undamaged piece with another undamaged piece.

If you do file a claim and you own your car outright (do not have a lien on it), you do not have to have all of the damages repaired. Consider if your car is damaged across the fender, two doors, and quarter panel but only cosmetically. You could choose to only replace the side mirror and then pocket the rest.

Below is also a good article. One situation that annoys me is when policyholders think their iPod and Gucci suitcase is covered when it's stolen out their cars. Sorry but read your policy. Would it be fair for someone doesn't own an iPod (or keeps it at home) to pay the same rates as some genius who keeps his iPod in his car? Hmmm.


Quote:
The Basics
What to do after a car accident
It's material you'd rather not read. But if you're in a car accident, you'll need to be familiar with the policy, the process and the payments.

By Insure.com
Your heart is beating hard, you're breathing fast and you can't believe you just got into an accident. Look around. You're alive? Good. Everyone else? Even better. Now here's what you need to do once the dust settles.

You should:

Keep your auto insurance information in the glove compartment, including a pre-printed form allowing you to provide the particulars of any accident, including a sketch of the scene. (Even better, use that disposable camera you keep in the car. You don't? You should.)

Stay at the scene of the accident until police have come and gone, making sure you have the name of the officer(s) and that they have your version of what happened. Do not assume a police report will "take you off the hook" or even that one will be generated in the event of a minor accident ("minor" may mean no one is injured even though your car suffers a direct hit).

Exchange names, addresses, driver's license and insurance information with the driver of the other car.

Review your policy to make sure of your coverage. Make a list of questions and related information you want to know.

Report the accident promptly to your insurance company. This may not seem wise or necessary to you. The accident may be minor, you may not want to risk seeing your rates rise or you may live in a no-fault state and think that the other driver's insurance company will pay for everything. But state laws generally protect you from higher rates unless an accident was your fault. And even though you may think no-fault lets you off the hook for the other driver's medical expenses, it does not. It simply says his insurance will pay for his expenses (up to the limits of his coverage), regardless of who is at fault. But rest assured his insurance company will come knocking on your insurer's door seeking repayment if it believes you were at fault in the accident. The point is, your insurer should be informed.

Think that's the end of it? Read on.

The policy
Admit it. You've never read your auto insurance policy, you don't want to read it and even if you're in an accident, you're still not sure if it would force you into those endless lines of fine print and insurance-speak. Assuming you can even find the policy.

If you can, look in the back for what are called the conditions of your policy -- what you are supposed to do in the event of an accident. These requirements are pretty straightforward, although compliance may seem like a hassle when you're already upset by the accident itself. But you may forfeit some of your rights if you don't follow these instructions.

Next, look at the cover sheet of the policy, which is called the declarations page and which lists the types and dollar limits of your coverage, including short-hand references to any discounts or special provisions you have elected to purchase.

Last, there's the actual insuring agreement itself, which explains what your insurer is protecting you against, including definitions of terms used in the agreement and explanations of what's not covered (called the exclusions).

If you don't understand your policy, keep calling your agent and/or state insurance department until you get clear answers to your questions. Most people have heard that ignorance is no defense under the law, but they don't think they'll ever have to find out. Auto accidents are one of the most common ways to discover the sobering cost of ignorance.

The payments
Hopefully, your accident involves only damages to things and not to people. And, hopefully, it wasn't your fault.

Even if it's just your car that's banged up, repairs can be a major headache. This is where the reality sets in that replacement cost is not the same thing as market value. Your car can easily be declared a total loss even though the money you'd receive is nowhere near what it would cost you to replace the vehicle.

The best advice about getting your car fixed is to remember that the money may be coming from the insurance company but you should control the repair process. This means refusing to settle for a repair job you don't like. And it may also mean refusing to accept the use of generic replacement parts instead of the original manufacturer's parts (your policy may give your insurer the right to use generic parts, so it's important to check the fine print to know your rights). Even if your favorite shop doesn't do the repairs, you can still have your mechanic look at the car (although this may be at your personal expense) and provide an assessment of what should be fixed. Ultimately, it's your car and your call about what's done to it.

Talk to your agent and/or insurer about your rights (better still, you should really ask these questions before you buy a policy). And if you don't like the answers, call your state insurance department.

Copyright insure.com. All rights reserved.

On the Internet since early 1995, insure.com is a leader in providing insurance information and is unequalled in its breadth and depth. The site currently hosts more than 20,000 pages of content, including interactive tools to assist consumers in their insurance decisions, and adds 30 to 40 new items each week. insure.com is regularly ranked as one of the Web's best providers of consumer insurance information and guidance
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Old 01-10-2008, 05:55 PM   #9 (permalink)
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OH MY GOD don't even get me started on USAA!

Well, now I'm started. Damnit.

When we moved from Arizona to Michigan I called USAA and had them change our limits to the Michigan minimums. They were super nice, as always, and promptly raised our monthly payment from $190 to $440.

We had NEVER had an accident, never been issued a speeding ticket, NEVER even been late on a payment. The only claim we have EVER made was a comprehensive claim on his eclipse after someone took a baseball bat to the side window when it was parked on the street (several other cars on the street had the same misfortune, and it was an upscale Scottsdale neighborhood).

Guess what? I just saved a bunch of money on car insurance by switching to Geico. About $140/month, to be exact. When I called USAA and said I had found a much better rate (with a lower deductible and better coverage) with another company USAA didn't even try to offer me a more competitive rate. They just said "sorry you feel that you have to leave us." Like, whatever. Assholes.

As you mentioned, they're totally nice and sweet but they're definitely not out to save you any money. I say fuck 'em, go shopping for new car insurance. Worked for me!
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Old 01-11-2008, 08:49 AM   #10 (permalink)
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That's unfortunate
Although I can see why the rates went up with the move. Michigan has a lot more factors for possibilities than Arizona. Poor thing.
Meh I still love em.
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Old 01-13-2008, 08:18 PM   #11 (permalink)
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You will get a nice break once you hit 25. Its all I looked forward to when I hit that age.
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Old 01-20-2008, 05:12 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Location: The Great White North
Quote:
Originally Posted by TotalMILF
OH MY GOD don't even get me started on USAA!

Well, now I'm started. Damnit.

When we moved from Arizona to Michigan I called USAA and had them change our limits to the Michigan minimums. They were super nice, as always, and promptly raised our monthly payment from $190 to $440.

We had NEVER had an accident, never been issued a speeding ticket, NEVER even been late on a payment. The only claim we have EVER made was a comprehensive claim on his eclipse after someone took a baseball bat to the side window when it was parked on the street (several other cars on the street had the same misfortune, and it was an upscale Scottsdale neighborhood).

Guess what? I just saved a bunch of money on car insurance by switching to Geico. About $140/month, to be exact. When I called USAA and said I had found a much better rate (with a lower deductible and better coverage) with another company USAA didn't even try to offer me a more competitive rate. They just said "sorry you feel that you have to leave us." Like, whatever. Assholes.

As you mentioned, they're totally nice and sweet but they're definitely not out to save you any money. I say fuck 'em, go shopping for new car insurance. Worked for me!
MI is a no fault state so rates are higher. I moved here from FL with GIECO and my rates sored so I switched. Progressive has been unbeatable.

On the % of fault thing - I disagree and have a police report to prove it. I was hit from the side and the officer said the other driver was obviously 100% at fault. That's how insurance took it and here we are.

24, single...you are screwed for now. I would, however, check around for better rates. You usually get huge discounts for paying in advance - sometime as much as 20%. Bite the bullit, save up for the next 6 months and pay in advance!
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Old 01-20-2008, 01:54 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Location: Anchorage, AK
Well tomorrow is my first day off in a month! and I will be shopping around.

i will shop at :

progressive

statefarm

allstate

geico


there were about two more that I saw on tv that i forgot the name of: it was NOT esurance. it was something else.

also, thanks for the insight and i knew the whole "you are 24 and single " was going to come up. but this was the first accident so that is why i was shocked.
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Old 01-20-2008, 07:15 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Yeah, I was torn between Progressive and Geico. Their rates and coverage were almost identical. I ended up choosing Geico because their rates will be even better than USAA's ever were once we get back to Arizona. And I love the gecko.

Good luck!
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Old 01-20-2008, 07:59 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Location: Greater Boston area
all of you are lucky. you live in states that allow competitive auto insurance practices. the state sets the rates here. doesnt matter which company you use they all charge the same.
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Old 01-20-2008, 09:24 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Location: Portland Or-ah-gun
Quote:
Originally Posted by blktour
Well tomorrow is my first day off in a month! and I will be shopping around.

i will shop at :

progressive

statefarm

allstate

geico


there were about two more that I saw on tv that i forgot the name of: it was NOT esurance. it was something else.
Those are four of the top six. The other two are Farmers & Allied/Nationwide.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotzlid
all of you are lucky. you live in states that allow competitive auto insurance practices. the state sets the rates here. doesnt matter which company you use they all charge the same.
I'm also pretty sure at least half of the aforementioned Top 6 sell in 49 states and the District of Columbia. That will remain for the foreseeable future as long as the MA department of insurance insists can burying their heads in the sand. Sorry dude.
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Old 01-20-2008, 09:57 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fotzlid
all of you are lucky. you live in states that allow competitive auto insurance practices. the state sets the rates here. doesnt matter which company you use they all charge the same.
Could this be considered good news to those of us with multiple accidents and moving violations?
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Old 01-20-2008, 10:22 PM   #18 (permalink)
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I have a considerable amount of experience in the area of auto accident claims and in judging the "quality" of the competing, major insurance carriers.

"No fault" is a term reserved for bodily injury claims, not property damage. Some states have laws, where, below a certain monetary threshhold, for the purpose of avoiding lawsuits and protracted negotiations over small dollar amount medical expenses, they are considered "no fault"....your own carrier pays the medical bills, without consideration of who is "at fault".

In the area of first and third party auto collision damage claims, it is my experience that attorneys lack knowledge, or much interest in representing you in the process of getting paid by the driver who has caused the accident.
The reason is because attorneys charge so much, most cases are about small enough amounts, that legal expenses suck the money out of the settlement that you would depend on to repair or replace your vehicle. Lawyers end up having very little experience in this area, they don't like to bother with it, and if a lawyer agrees to help, he has to charge you his standard hourly rate. Even if he got you a $10,000 damage settlement, you cannot afford to give him a third of it, and $3300 won't be enough for his time spent, if your case ends up in court, and it takes too long.

If you are male, especially a single one, and under 25, or up to 30 in some places and circumstances (unmarried, recent traffic offenses, prior collision or claims against your policy by other drivers or their carriers, NO INSURER WANTS YOUR BUSINESS. WAIT UNTIL YOU'VE TURNED 25 to shop for another company.

The best companies, if you're cost conscious, are ones without agents. You're paying foir you agent's business expenses and livelihood. Where else would the money come from? the best company....great service and customer satisfaction....I've been a customer, per Consumer Reports readers survey, is AMICA. They will have a couple of regional offices in your state, you have to be referred by one of their current customers, live in a zip code that they do business in, and they are not cheap upfront, after the year ends, they refund a 20 or 25 percent diviidend.

Obtain the Consumer Reports, annual readers survey of auto insurers, check at your library, or join online at their website. Ratinfs drop off, after AMICA at the top of their survey.

Here is one 2007 survey:
http://www.jdpower.com/finance/ratin...ance/index.asp

The business of insurance and baseball are the only ones in the US exempt from anit-trust regs. Competitors compare notes, all do credit checks, collaborate to set prices of premiums, and, for them, it is not illegal, There is no federal regulation, and state laws vary.

The two largest insurers, State Farm and Allstate, both have agents to sell and service their policies. I would stay away from both of them. GEICO is fine for older drivers, and they just screwed my 24 yr old son, jacked up his premium after he made a relatively small, vandalism damgage, compensation calim....remember FILE NO CLAIMS, except the BIG ONE, maybe once in your life....

USAA does have many satisfied customers, but, at your age, eveyone is treated similarly by every company, especially if you've made a claim. Progressive has a rep of writing policies for people who cannot get insurance from other companies, and they charge accordingly.

If you're over 25, and you are a AAA motor club member, check their website or a local office for rates. If you work for a large employer, ask at your human resources office for afiliated insurers. Search for insurance at www.costco.com if you are a member.

If you want a second opinion, call the largest independent property damage appraisal service, and ask the owner or a key person in the office who they are insured with. If you can get them to admit it, ask who the worst companies that they deal with are.

ALL OF THEM ARE GREAT IF YOU HAVE A CLEAN RECORD AND NEVER MAKE A CLAIM. THEY ALL HATE TO PROCESS AND PAY CLAIMS, and they hate customers who become claimants, and then they want to get rid of you or charge you enough to make back what they paid and future profits.

If you must use an agent, pick multiline, indpendent agent who sells policies for ten or twenty companies. If he's interested in bothering spending the time to find insurance for one, young driver with a blemsihed record, he can offer you a comparison of rates and features of several policies from several companies. Rates are generally lower when stock or bond markets are doing well, because they are influenced by investment returns, as well as by your age, marital status and driving record. Investment return is in a slump for the forseeable future, so there won't be any help, in that regard.

My best advice....DO NOT MAKE ANY CLAIMS for damages to your own vehicle that are less than $5,000.00 if you have any other alternative. If damage is cosmetic and does not involve functionality, and you are partially or fully at fault....do NOT make a collision claim. The money you receive for your claim, is more of a high interest loan, than a payout....you are living the consequences. I am sure that, in hindsight, you would have tried harder to work out privately, who would pay what for your respective damage, if neither of you was ticketed by an investigating officer.

AVOID, when you have a choice...driving in parking lots or on other private property. Do not take that elective, "cut through". Rules of the road and traffic laws, except enforcement of fire lanes and handicapped parking signs,
do not apply, in many places, on non-public roads and lots. This means, in the event of an accident in a parking lot, it is difficult to get blame assigned to the other driver, even if a police person is willing to investigate and write a report. You will most likely have to pay your own damages or file a claim with your own insurer, no matter who is actually to blame.

If you are involved in an accident and you have the good fortune where the other party is found at fault, and is ticketed, or if you confirm that the accident report of the investigating officer determines that the other driver is at fault, make only a third party claim on the other driver's policy. Do not even tell your company, or agent, if there are no injuries involved, you are not at fault, and were not ticketed, that you have been in an accident. Obtain a cooy of the accident report from the police agency, by first asking the investigating officer at the scene, where to obtain it, when, and how much the fee for it will be charged.

When you request a copy of an accident report, request the overlay or code reference sheet, so that you can understand every code/abbrev.on the report

You will not be getting any refund of all or part of your deductible, in my experience, if the accident was partially your fault.

Once you are satisfied that the other driver was ticketed or named as at fault on the accident report....be sure....and there are no injuries to anyone in either car that could turn into a potential claim on your policy, call the other drivers company, ask for auto damage claims and state that you are making a third party damage claim agains their policyholder. Volunteer to hand carry the accident report to their office, if it is feasible and you want to expedite your claim. If the other driver is at fault, and his company is not a "fly by night" insurer, ask on the initial call for rental car coverage, immediately if your vehicle is inoperable or unsafe, billed to them, or, commencing at the time repairs begin.

You will pay no deductible, because you would prevail in a small claims court or a higher civil court suit. The other company, if it cannot defend against your claim because their driver was ticketed or named as responsible in the accident report, wants to settle at minimum expense.

If your car is newer and of high enough value, and you intend to have full repairs made to it, do not accept a "final offer" payment. Choes a repair shop, if it is a larger one, they can even guide you in the thurd party claims process. They prefer third party claims, because there are no deductibles to be harangued over, by claimants wishing to avoid paying them. If your goal is a full repair, it does not matter what the initial damage apparaisal amount is. Simply get a commitment from your repair shop to do the work as described on the appraisers damage report, at no out of pocket cost to you. Hidden, addtional damage, cost of additional parts and labor, and other items missed by the appraiser representing the other driver's insurer, will be paid for in a supplemental billing by that insurer.

Make sure your repaier repairer agrees, before repairs commence, to release your vehicle to you when you are satisfied that repairs are complete, for only the amount you have initially been paid by the insurere, Sign an authorization for the insurere to pay the repairer directly for any addtional amounts, or for the entire cost of repair, for that matter. The repairer will call the appraiser for any addtional inspection of your vehicle during repairs.

If someone else damged your car, this is the best way to deal with it. If you file any claim with your own company, expect to pay your deductible, at least initially, a portion of your rental car expense, and risk having a claim on your "record". Refrain from making any small auto or homeowner claim. Insureres even track addresses for claims experience ratings. Check the claims activity on an address before you buy the property, it could affect your policy rate.

....and get yourself married and over age 30, with no claims or traffic tickets, ASAP. Otherwise, no matter how indignant you may feel, you have little or no bargaining power.

Last edited by host; 01-20-2008 at 11:41 PM..
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Old 01-21-2008, 12:19 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Location: Spokane, WA
http://www.amfam.com/ if you're looking to switch.

Unbelievable rates. I get full coverage on a newer 2d coupe for what my old insurance company (Progressive) charged for liability only on a 10 year old car.
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Old 01-21-2008, 05:44 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Location: The Great White North
Quote:
Originally Posted by host
I have a considerable amount of experience in the area of auto accident claims and in judging the "quality" of the competing, major insurance carriers.

"No fault" is a term reserved for bodily injury claims, not property damage. Some states have laws, where, below a certain monetary threshhold, for the purpose of avoiding lawsuits and protracted negotiations over small dollar amount medical expenses, they are considered "no fault"....your own carrier pays the medical bills, without consideration of who is "at fault".
I am no expert but I beg to differ unless I misunderstood you. I define bodily injury as happening to a person as in medical, property to something outside the car and comprehensive/collision as the actual car.

No Fault in MI means your insurance company pays for damage to your car (as in collision), regardless of who is at fault. If you are sitting on the side of the road and someone slams into you, your insurance pays for your car. You pay a deductable unless you purchase the broad form coverage which then takes car of your deductable AS LONG AS you are less than 50% at fault.

Although I was never involved in an accident in FL, another no fault state, I'm, pretty sure the same thing applies there as well.
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Old 01-21-2008, 06:02 AM   #21 (permalink)
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host, thingstodo is right. "No Fault" is a specific term used in certain states. It's been misused a lot in this thread, but thingstodo has the right definition. host, you've described "Medical Payments" coverage on the GL form, and I know that there's a corresponding coverage on the Auto form, but I can't remember the name at the moment.

And "Bodily Injury" is "bodily injury, sickness or disease sustained by a person, including death resulting for any of these at any time" on the General Liability form. I don't have an Auto form handy, but I expect that the language is going to be very similar if not identical.

As for the rest of this thread, there's a lot of misinformation floating through it. I don't have the time or inclination to disprove all the errors, but suffice it to say that any insurance buyer needs to read their policy and understand their duties in claim reporting. Failure to report claims in a timely manner can leave you with no coverage since the insurer will have no duty to defend you. You can notify any insurance company for "record only" and let them know you will fix the car yourself. Every state gives you that right, and by notifying them you've protected yourself against what the other driver is going to do.
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Old 02-04-2008, 06:54 PM   #22 (permalink)
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So update:

I called USAA and they said that they are rating me correctly. The rep over the phone said that she sent it to two different under writers ( or whatever you call them.) and they said that they charged me correctly.

So I went shopping around to ALLSTATE, STATE FARM, GEICO, PROGRESSIVE, and ALL of them and i mean ALL of them offered me $150 cheaper than USAA. I asked how much with my driving record without the accident, and i got about $140, but with the backing up incident, it shot up to $230 ( that being the highest through progressive.)

these were all with my driving record pulled. not just an estimate.

so in the end I called them back and told them that I would be going to Geico, that is going to charge me $204 with my accident.
Same coverage.

They are good, and nice, and the insurance, i have read it all since I came from them to USAA in the first place.

MY main thing that I pointed out the the rep over the phone was that I had been paying for some time now every month of about $180/mo and then one accident it shot up to $2377 for 6 months. the accident alone total with both parties was about $2400 so in 6 months I will pay for both accidents in full, and then they wont even count the other payments every month that I was paying them?

That just got me.

Now I am not up on the insurance stuff and i know that it is a business but come on. you are taking money from me every month and when I do get in an accident, I STILL GET charged more?

so knowing and understanding this is a business, I just packed up all my money of car insurance, and all my savings and checkings money and went to Bank of America.

I just think that if they werent so "greedy" ( in my eyes is how i see it. ) that they could keep my money in their bank and make money off of it, and still charged me at least on insurance $250 every 6 months. they were still getting paid. but no. they wont get a thing from me.

they didnt give me the "pickle."

at my job, ( work in customer service. ) I have rules. but to satisfy a customer I will break the rules to make them happy. especially an escalated customer.

I gave her a chance. and she didnt bite. oh well. Now I feel better about myself and how I treat my customers, and try to help them out, and save them money.
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Old 02-04-2008, 09:24 PM   #23 (permalink)
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interesting....

I just did a look up on progressive.com just to see if I'd get a better rate than Geico. not really, but I did learn something I didn't realize is that credit scores affect insurance rates. I guess those people who live on credit are also considered higher risks for accidents. I don't understand the correllation but whatever, I don't have bad credit.

Good for you on saving some money... no reason to just give it away without a fight.
Quote:
Insurance Scores: What You Should Know
LINK
What is an insurance score?

An insurance score is a score calculated from information on your credit report. Credit information is very predictive of future accidents or insurance claims, which is why Progressive, and most insurers, uses this information to help develop more accurate rates. Each insurer has its own method for evaluating this credit information. At Progressive, we develop our method by analyzing the following data from people we have insured:


Also On Progressive.com

Understanding Insurance
After an accident, should you move off the road?

Driving Destinations
Chinese New Year Celebrations in the U.S.

Auto Tech
Technology Drives Cars to the Forefront at CES

Accident and insurance claim history
Credit report information
The results of this analysis tell us what credit information will help us predict how likely you are to have a future accident or insurance claim. We assign a value to each predictive credit factor and add the values to calculate your insurance score. The lower your score with us, the better.

Are insurance scores the same as credit scores?
No. A credit score is based on your ability to repay amounts you have borrowed. An insurance score predicts the likelihood of you becoming involved in a future accident or insurance claim it is based on information gathered from policyholders with similar credit characteristics who have had previous claims with us.

When banks and other lenders determine credit scores, they may factor in your income, job history and other matters that might affect your ability to repay a loan. Banks also can deny you a loan based on your credit score. We do not consider income or job history, and we won't deny you a policy based on your insurance score.

What credit factors can affect an insurance score?
Favorable credit information results in lower premiums. Because both above-average and below-average factors are evaluated, you still have the opportunity to get a lower rate, even if there are some below-average items in your credit history.

Favorable credit factors might include:
Long-established credit history
Numerous open accounts in good standing
No late payments or past due accounts
Low use of available credit
Unfavorable credit factors might include:
Collection accounts
Numerous past-due payments
High use of available credit
Numerous recent applications for credit
These factors vary by state to comply with the laws of each state.

How can I improve an unfavorable insurance score?
While there are some things that are out of your control having a short credit history, for instance you can generally improve your insurance score with us by making loan and mortgage payments on time, keeping accounts in good standing, and avoiding numerous credit applications in a short period of time.

Also, look at how much credit you have available. If you are using all or nearly all of your available credit, it could be regarded as an unfavorable factor.
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Old 02-05-2008, 06:07 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Cyn - part of the reason they look at credit (and only a part, mind you) is that poor credit can be an indicator for insurance fraud. That's not to say that everyone with bad credit is a fraudster, just that fraudsters tend to have bad credit.

Interestingly enough, this holds true for commercial insurance as well as personal.
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Old 02-05-2008, 06:52 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Old 02-05-2008, 12:20 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Jazz
Cyn - part of the reason they look at credit (and only a part, mind you) is that poor credit can be an indicator for insurance fraud. That's not to say that everyone with bad credit is a fraudster, just that fraudsters tend to have bad credit.

Interestingly enough, this holds true for commercial insurance as well as personal.
Even more than that, how you handle credit demonstrates how you handle things in general. It is used in all insurance coverage - life, medical and home owners.
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Old 02-05-2008, 12:27 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thingstodo
Even more than that, how you handle credit demonstrates how you handle things in general. It is used in all insurance coverage - life, medical and home owners.
true.

even landlords and employers run credit checks.
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Old 02-16-2008, 12:44 PM   #28 (permalink)
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new UPDATE:

So I just got an email from the lady that I was working with at USAA and she had some new rates that she said that just came around for thier fiscal year, and she re-ran my information to give me a quote and the quote is $838 for 6 months.

So would it be bad to change back or is that just greedy or wrong?

what would you all do?

i know I have to read the fine prints and all but if all comes out good and clean, do you all think i should do it?

I just feel somewhat bad for jumping back and forth. ( I know I am odd like that. )
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Old 02-16-2008, 02:03 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Business is business. However, sometimes the more you switch things like this the more it impacts your credit rating because every time someone checks your credit it has an impact on your score for a period of time.

I can't really say since I don't know how much you're saving. If their rates are still good a year from now perhaps it would be worth changing.

Another way to save a lot of cash is to save up and pay the entire 6-month premium at one time. You'll usually save 25% of the premium by doing that. It might hurt for six months but once you've saved up you'll always be paying in full and then saving much less each month instead of giving a lot to the insurance company as virtual interest.
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Old 02-16-2008, 03:09 PM   #30 (permalink)
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about the credit issue. well my credit is really high, so I wonder how much it would hurt it by.

well i would be moving from $204 to $139/mo and I asked about paying the full 6 month term and both insurance companies that I asked do not give you a discount for that.
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Old 02-16-2008, 03:23 PM   #31 (permalink)
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My advice:

Quote:
http://www.credit.com/products/auto/...-Insurance.jsp
Insurance risk scores

When you apply for auto insurance, the insurer will ask you for permission to check your credit score under FCRA regulations. The insurer will then pull your credit reports from one or more credit bureaus and calculate your insurance risk score based upon this data. This credit inquiry will appear on your credit report but does not usually harm your credit score...
If your new insurer does not levy a large cancellation fee, switch back to USAA ASAP, but "pay" the money you save in cost of premiums into an account intended to cushion you against any future, unplanned mishaps, i.e., the potential of making another auto insurance claim. Consider using the money you accumulate to mitigate the risk of changing your collision/comprehensive deductible amount, say, from $500 to $1,000; a change that should lower your premium further.
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Old 02-16-2008, 03:57 PM   #32 (permalink)
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So what you're saying is if Geico doesnt charge any cancellation fees then go back to USAA, and then if i am going from $204 to $139, i should pay the $204 x6 to USAA to cover me?

that sounds like a good idea.

any other advice before I do the "leap" again?
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Old 02-16-2008, 05:14 PM   #33 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by host
My advice:



If your new insurer does not levy a large cancellation fee, switch back to USAA ASAP, but "pay" the money you save in cost of premiums into an account intended to cushion you against any future, unplanned mishaps, i.e., the potential of making another auto insurance claim. Consider using the money you accumulate to mitigate the risk of changing your collision/comprehensive deductible amount, say, from $500 to $1,000; a change that should lower your premium further.
It is illegal for an admitted insurance company (and all states require that personal auto be written by admitted carriers) to have any sort of minimum earned premium. That means that you can cancel the coverage the day after binding coverage and not have to pay an exorbitant fee.

That does not mean that you will necessarily get a prorated return premium. You could get a "short rate" return, which means that it is the prorated premium minus a percentage (typically 10% but possibly as much as 20%). It may not be spelled out in the policy wording, but they have to disclose it if you ask.

So ask Geico and see what they say.
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Old 02-16-2008, 05:39 PM   #34 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blktour
So what you're saying is if Geico doesnt charge any cancellation fees then go back to USAA, and then if i am going from $204 to $139, i should pay the $204 x6 to USAA to cover me?

that sounds like a good idea.

any other advice before I do the "leap" again?
I believe host is suggesting that YOU save the difference in a bank account, coffee can, or mattress whichever you feel most comfortable with.


If you take the $65 and save it, after 1 year you should have $780, after 2 ears $1596, etc. If you have to make another claim in 3 years, you are better off paying it with those funds.

As far as impact to your credit, if you are buying a house in the near future, it may make a difference since it will immediately impact your FICO in some fashion.
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:00 AM   #35 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blktour
about the credit issue. well my credit is really high, so I wonder how much it would hurt it by.

well i would be moving from $204 to $139/mo and I asked about paying the full 6 month term and both insurance companies that I asked do not give you a discount for that.
First, your credit can never be "really high" unless you've had GREAT credit for many years along with a good income, stable employment and managable debt. Your credit score is reduced a little every time your credit is checked. You just switched companies which means it has been checked at least twice.

On another note, it is difficult to believe that any company would charge you the same whether you paid the premium monthly or on a periodic basis. Financing is going on in some fashion. Progressive does it that way, GIECO did when I had them as well as Allstate. But perhaps I'm wrong.
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Old 02-17-2008, 12:43 PM   #36 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thingstodo
First, your credit can never be "really high" unless you've had GREAT credit for many years along with a good income, stable employment and managable debt. Your credit score is reduced a little every time your credit is checked. You just switched companies which means it has been checked at least twice.

On another note, it is difficult to believe that any company would charge you the same whether you paid the premium monthly or on a periodic basis. Financing is going on in some fashion. Progressive does it that way, GIECO did when I had them as well as Allstate. But perhaps I'm wrong.

well my credit score is Really high for my age. I wanted to get a home last year and it came out at 793. I dont know how but it did.

So I can't really complain with that.

how much is it reduced by?

So I have a score of 793 and then I have someone check my credit and then it goes to what? given that nothing else changes on my credit?

As far as USAA and GEICO; they do NOT give me a discount for paying early. I asked two different reps at both places.

So are they lying to me?
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Old 02-18-2008, 08:23 AM   #37 (permalink)
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I dunno how many points it goes down for the inquiry. 2 inquiries are the cost.

No discount for paying early? Interesting, Allstate and Geico both have printed information on my bill at the beginning of the year that tell me how much I save if I pre-pay for the year. Maybe I'm confusing something on the geico bill. I'll have to look again.
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Old 02-18-2008, 01:37 PM   #38 (permalink)
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I think you guys are wrong about credit checks hurting your score.

Yes credit checks followed by denials hurt your scores but these companies do a different type of credit check which doesn't hurt your score.

I found some info on the credit scores

http://www.myfico.com/CreditEducatio...Inquiries.aspx

Quote:
When you check your credit report, you may notice that a number of credit inquiries have been made, sometimes from businesses that you don’t know. But the only inquiries that count toward your FICO score are the ones that result from your applications for new credit.

* Inquiries that count toward your FICO score.
There is only one type of credit inquiry that counts toward your FICO score. When you apply for a mortgage, auto loan or other credit, you authorize the lender to request a copy of your credit report. These types of inquiries, prompted by your own actions, appear on your credit report and are included in your FICO score.
* Inquiries that don’t count toward your FICO score.
Your own credit report requests, credit checks made by businesses to offer you goods or services, or inquiries made by businesses with whom you already have a credit account do not count toward your FICO score. Credit checks by prospective employers also do not count. These types of inquiries may appear on your credit report, but they are not included in your FICO score.

Last edited by Rekna; 02-18-2008 at 01:39 PM.. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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Old 02-19-2008, 05:26 PM   #39 (permalink)
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Rekna...your note clearly states that:

* Inquiries that count toward your FICO score.
There is only one type of credit inquiry that counts toward your FICO score. When you apply for a mortgage, auto loan or other credit, you authorize the lender to request a copy of your credit report. These types of inquiries, prompted by your own actions, appear on your credit report and are included in your FICO score.

Insurance companies are giving you credit when they give you insurance. That's how the industry works. The inquiries that don't count are all passive and you can even stop most of them with a fraud alert which also cuts down on the credit offers you receive in the mail.

A credit check with a denial is still just a check. If they deny you've already got problems!
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Old 02-19-2008, 05:47 PM   #40 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thingstodo
Rekna...your note clearly states that:

* Inquiries that count toward your FICO score.
There is only one type of credit inquiry that counts toward your FICO score. When you apply for a mortgage, auto loan or other credit, you authorize the lender to request a copy of your credit report. These types of inquiries, prompted by your own actions, appear on your credit report and are included in your FICO score.

Insurance companies are giving you credit when they give you insurance. That's how the industry works. The inquiries that don't count are all passive and you can even stop most of them with a fraud alert which also cuts down on the credit offers you receive in the mail.

A credit check with a denial is still just a check. If they deny you've already got problems!
They are not giving you credit. In fact most insurance agencies just started doing credit checks. I have looked at my credit report recently and the insurance credit checks were under the section of checks that do not affect credit.
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