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Old 07-07-2009, 11:05 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Anyone heard of CutCo?

Hey TFP folks,

I'm working this summer selling kitchen cutlery called "CutCo" I was just curious if any of you had ever heard of it/used it/own it and your thoughts on it?

www . cutco . com

(Just saying this upfront, i'm NOT trying to sell any product using the forums I'm only curious as to your thoughts)
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Old 07-07-2009, 11:08 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Have you paid for your demo knives yet? Because what I've heard about them is that that's the main way the company makes money--selling demo sets to their salespeople.
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Old 07-07-2009, 11:11 AM   #3 (permalink)
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I used to work right by a place that sold these knives. They would train people in the building right next to ours and we shared the same smoking area. I'd sit out and recruit them to come work for us instead, as our commission rates were much higher and people bought our product a lot more often...

Anyway, I met a lot of the people who sold these knives, and learned quite a bit about the sales pitch and the product. It seems to me CutCo has a high quality product, but, as with anything that's truly high quality, you have to pay a pretty penny. It's just hard to get most people to spring upwards of $1,000 for a cutlery set...

If you're a good enough salesman, though, you can make a killing with that company. Best of luck to you.
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Old 07-07-2009, 11:25 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Excellent quality knives that you will keep for life.
Other than that, I don't know much about their company.
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Old 07-07-2009, 12:45 PM   #5 (permalink)
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They called me and asked me to go work for them. They told me the had a $15 base pay. Little did I know it wasn't $15/hr, but $15 for every customer you schedule an interview with ... I laughed in their faces.
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Old 07-07-2009, 12:48 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I know a few people that have sold their knives. I don't remember which TFP member sold knives here and if they were the same company....
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Old 07-07-2009, 12:51 PM   #7 (permalink)
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I would have an inherent distrust of anything offered to me for sale at my front door.
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Old 07-07-2009, 01:10 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Just about everybody has an inherent distrust anytime somebody approaches them in any manner to sell them something...

This is where the salesman's job comes in.
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Old 07-07-2009, 01:38 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I did this the summer I graduated from high school...I made about as much money to pay off my demo knives. They are nice knives and I still have them but honestly it was too much of a hassle to really be worth it. They tell you all kinds of stories about how people make thousands of dollars during the summer selling knives and while it is possible to do so it's pretty much a full time job to do so. It's almost like a pyramid scheme (the company is legit though) but you start out with people you know and get referrals. You call those referrals and try to set up appointments and keep getting referrals. It's not like you go door to door in a random neighborhood.

The problem is, unless you are willing to be a travelling salesperson making calls and driving around all day you really tap out on your market quickly. I had a job at a movie theater at the time and I was just looking for something to make a little extra money on top of that before I went to college, it ended up being more trouble than what it was worth especially since I was working almost every day at my other job.

Sure I could have quit my minimum wage job at the theater...and go full time selling knives, but honestly the theater job was easy and fun and I didn't want to drive around all day making sales calls.
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Old 07-07-2009, 01:45 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I thought they were a big pyramid scheme? Have they gotten more legit in recent years? They were all over the place a few years back, and were largely exposed as a big scam.. didn't pay for gas, didn't give you any base pay, just paid you if you sold knives, and forced you to buy your demo knives from them..
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Old 07-07-2009, 03:24 PM   #11 (permalink)
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DON'T DO IT! Same with Kirby vacuums, both will cost you money and not make you any, but might make the company some. I have had experience with both as have friends of mine. BAD DEAL. Steer clear of them and you'll thank me later.

Jinn you are right, same with Kirby. No base pay, didn't compensate gas, only pays you commission for what you sale, and I believe you have to sell something like 10 sets before you pay off your demo set you have to buy from them. They are good knives, but the sales person gets screwed. At least with Kirby they give you a demo vacuum to show, that you can keep after you sell like 5 of them or you can just keep the $ and keep using the demo one. Only thing is, if it gets scratched or anything, you get charged for it. Very shady practices there. Also their sales methods are so aggressive and rude that when I was demonstrating to one of my friends of many years he was so offended he threw me out of his house, same thing with my own mother.
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Old 07-07-2009, 03:27 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Also their sales methods are so aggressive and rude that when I was demonstrating to one of my friends of many years he was so offended he threw me out of his house, same thing with my own mother.
Oh, I gotta hear more about this. You've gotta be kidding. It's a gawdamn'd vacuum cleaner. How did this happen?
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Old 07-07-2009, 04:50 PM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Its legit. Both my sister and one of my friend sold cutco products. It's true that you have to buy the demo set but individually, that set would be close to 500$ from cutco and you get it for 150$ so even if you were to quit after your 1st day, you still get an awesome deal! and yes, I did buy some of their knives. Best quality I've seen in knives and BBQ tools.
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Old 07-07-2009, 05:33 PM   #14 (permalink)
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CutCo! EdgeCom! InterSlice!
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Old 07-07-2009, 07:11 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Oh, I gotta hear more about this. You've gotta be kidding. It's a gawdamn'd vacuum cleaner. How did this happen?
The sales method they make you use, is basically a hour long of you cleaning their house for free while saying what it can do and how much it would cost if you did it otherwise (detailing your car would normally cost $100 x 6 times a year = $600 in value)

When when you finish cleaning their house you come to the close like a tv salesmen. "How much would you expect to pay for this given all the value I've showed you (you build up and have them write down over $10,000 a year which is ridiculous) and then it gets to the actual closing and trying to get the sale.

This involves you saying the original price (about $5,000 at the time) and when they say no, which 99.999% of people do, you offer it to them for $2,500 and say your not going to get any commission because you just want to get the sale because your 1 sale away from winning a sales contest and you win a trip to (fill in exotic destination you weaseled out of them earlier in the demonstration here) and then they will hopefully feel bad for you. When they say no now, you say let me call my supervisor and see if I can get him to knock off anything off your "cost of $2,500" You then get off the phone with him, and offer them the price of $1,500 and he's taking a hit of $1,000. BTW: When I say offer, I mean badger them about it and repeating over and over the value that you demonstrated and how much they'd be "saving". They decline again, you call your supervisor again, when you hang up you repeat the process but this time for $1,000. They decline again, you call your supervisor again, when you hang up, you repeat again for $595. If they decline again, you then offer financing. They decline again, you call your supervisor and he gets on the phone with them, badgers them too and offers them better financing.

As you can tell, this would get very VERY annoying and piss people off. Especially since even if they say they don't want it, no matter how much the price is, your supervisor will not count the trip for you unless you call him x number of times or if you get a sell.

Now about them counting the trips, why is this important? Well when you first start (for the first 3 months) they say you get commission or $3,000 a month if you don't make any commission. However you have to have 30 counted appointments a month to get that, so you want them to count it if you don't make your commission. They also pay you monthly, for that if you don't make any sales that month, or they pay you weekly if you do make any sales. If you do make any sales, they better be good because as soon as you make a sale you no longer get the guaranteed $3,000. So for this entire time you are driving around, in your car, using your gas, transporting their vacuum cleaner like a china doll, because if even if it's scratched you have to buy it at "cost" ($545). They do not compensate you for this at all. Not a big deal if your making a couple sales a month right? Considering that if you sell it you actually get full commission minus the cost of the vacuum of $545. Well ya, but most people get down to the $595 price point where your only making $50. And guess what, if it's financed, there's "processing fees" that you have to pay that are $25. So you just spent a tank full of gas driving around cleaning people's houses for free to get $25. More than the cost of a tank of gas, and their "top sales people" average 1 a week. You do the math. It sucks.

Oh and another thing, they "show you" what you can get by doing this by driving these expensive cars and inviting you on your first weekend to their house for a party if you pass a test and get an appointment done before the party. I did this and they had the following

-15,000 sq ft mansion with pool, hot tub, basketball court and tennis court
-Brand new Escalade on 24" rims
-Brand new Jaguar Convertible on 20" rims
-Newer Wakeboard Boat
-3 New Waverunners

How do you think they afford that? By getting people to basically work for free. I went to cutco soon after that and saw the exact same thing happening just on a little smaller scale. Moral of the story, they are shady to work for, don't do it. But if you do get a chance, pick one up for the $595. Because they really are worth that and are nice, but not $5,000 nice.
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Old 07-08-2009, 06:25 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynthetiq View Post
I know a few people that have sold their knives. I don't remember which TFP member sold knives here and if they were the same company....
That would be me. I worked for Cutco for 3 years, spending my last year as an assistant manager, so I'm intimately aware of what it's like as a sales rep and as someone hiring and training the sales reps.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MexicanOnABike View Post
Its legit. Both my sister and one of my friend sold cutco products. It's true that you have to buy the demo set but individually, that set would be close to 500$ from cutco and you get it for 150$ so even if you were to quit after your 1st day, you still get an awesome deal! and yes, I did buy some of their knives. Best quality I've seen in knives and BBQ tools.
That pretty much sums it up, though one important point is missing: if you decide to quit, you can return the demo set for a full refund, so it's really not that big a deal. Of course, most people hear that you need to put down money for the demo set and tune out at that point, without listening to the rest.
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I did this the summer I graduated from high school...I made about as much money to pay off my demo knives. They are nice knives and I still have them but honestly it was too much of a hassle to really be worth it. They tell you all kinds of stories about how people make thousands of dollars during the summer selling knives and while it is possible to do so it's pretty much a full time job to do so. It's almost like a pyramid scheme (the company is legit though) but you start out with people you know and get referrals. You call those referrals and try to set up appointments and keep getting referrals. It's not like you go door to door in a random neighborhood.
Also an important point: it's not door-to-door selling. Yes, you work off referrals... it's easy to scoff at that, until you get a job doing pretty much any other type of sales and realize that's how most of them work. Unlike most other sales jobs, it really doesn't even matter if you sell much to your immediate contacts, so long as they give you referrals. There is a base pay per appointment (as someone else mentioned), and so long as you keep getting referrals then you keep doing demos. That said, as others have also mentioned it's a very good product, so if you're demonstrating it properly you're pretty much guaranteed to sell a reasonable amount.

A pyramid scheme is something entirely different though, so I don't really like being associated with that term: with a pyramid scheme you make the bulk of your money by getting other people into the organization, not by selling a product. Pyramid schemes make it difficult to understand how you actually make money, while the math required in calculating what you earn from Cutco can be done by any 8th grader.

Quote:
The problem is, unless you are willing to be a travelling salesperson making calls and driving around all day you really tap out on your market quickly. I had a job at a movie theater at the time and I was just looking for something to make a little extra money on top of that before I went to college, it ended up being more trouble than what it was worth especially since I was working almost every day at my other job.
This is an important point for anyone looking at working for Cutco: it's significantly less worth your time as a second job than if it is your primary job. As with any other sales job, the big question is how much money do you want to earn and how much are you willing to work for it? The less time you put into it, the more slowly you'll earn money, and the more likely you'll feel like it's not worth your time. Again, this is no different than any other sales job. In fact, I'd say Cutco is easier to succeed at and more laid back than most sales jobs. I applied to work at MetLife a few years back and one of the interview questions was essentially "Are you greedy enough for this job?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by phathom View Post
Jinn you are right, same with Kirby. No base pay, didn't compensate gas, only pays you commission for what you sale, and I believe you have to sell something like 10 sets before you pay off your demo set you have to buy from them. They are good knives, but the sales person gets screwed. At least with Kirby they give you a demo vacuum to show, that you can keep after you sell like 5 of them or you can just keep the $ and keep using the demo one. Only thing is, if it gets scratched or anything, you get charged for it. Very shady practices there. Also their sales methods are so aggressive and rude that when I was demonstrating to one of my friends of many years he was so offended he threw me out of his house, same thing with my own mother.
A lot of mistaken info here. As others have mentioned, there is a base pay (it differs depending on where you're located). They do not compensate gas, just like any other job in which you're an independent contractor (back to my interview with MetLife, they also would not compensate gas), but as an independent contractor pretty much everything you do is a business expense. Every single mile you drive is tax deductible and it's your own fault if you don't take advantage of that. I say that as someone who was stupid my first year on the job and didn't keep track of my miles - I don't blame anyone but myself. The demo set is $150, and the base pay is generally around $15. You don't need to sell 10 sets to make up the demo cost, just do 10 appointments. Odds are, if you're following the script, you'll make up the cost before then. As I mentioned above, it doesn't even matter because you can return the demo set when you're done with the job and get your money back, and unlike Kirby (apparently, I'm taking your word here), it doesn't matter if it's reasonably used.

(EDIT: I misunderstood when I first responded to this and thought the comment about sales methods referred to Cutco. I'm leaving the response, though, because I think it gives some insight into the experience one might have while selling Cutco.) As for the sales methods, when the sales pitch is done appropriately I think it's anything but aggressive and rude. They give you a script in training, teach you to follow the script, and even encourage you to look at the script during demos. For the majority of my first appointments, I was literally pulling out my script and reading from it as I demonstrated the knives. Sure, the script has you explain a set, ask if they want it, they say no, you break down the payment options, they say no, you explain the next set, ask if they want it, they say no, you break down the payment options, etc... but whether this is aggressive and rude really depends on how you do it, and you don't spend more than a few minutes on a set if they're not interested. When it comes down to it, it's just explaining the options so people can make an informed decision. What makes all the difference, I think, is how you react to the rejection. Most of the time when I was doing demos, we'd even get a good laugh out of how many times my potential customers would be saying no to me, and I'd just trudge right through the script until I reached the point they were interested. Sometimes I never reached that point, but no big deal because I was guaranteed $15 for the hour-long demonstration anyway. There are no special criteria for the demo to qualify, you just report how many demos you did (with name and phone number of person) and you get paid based on that. Because the product is good, it's fairly easy to tell when someone is lying about doing demos because it's pretty difficult to do a lot of demos and not sell something. If someone is suspected of lying, a manager will call through the demo list and ask something like "what'd you think about when he cut the can?" (there is no can cutting in the demo) to confirm. If it turns out the rep isn't lying, but is just doing a bad job, then the manager will have the rep go field training with one of the more successful reps to see how it's done.

Again, as with any sales job, there are people of varying morals involved, but with the people I worked with and for, lying was unacceptable, whether it's to your manager, or to a potential customer. That attitude was present whether I was talking to my district manager, my regional manager, or even when I spoke with one of the vice presidents of the company. I've heard stories about some bad managers out there, and I don't doubt they exist, but it reflects more on that individual office than on the company as a whole.

--------------

It should be obvious from my detailed response, but I enjoyed my work with Cutco quite a bit. That's not to say there weren't downsides: sales can be stressful work, and it can be difficult to keep your spirits up when you have a dry spell. They gave me all the tools I needed to succeed though, provided I did what I was taught. I went through the 3 day training, practiced, and was diligent at setting up appointments. I followed the script when I did my demonstrations - again, literally reading from it in the very beginning - and I did not make assumptions about what someone could or could not afford when explaining the available options. During my first summer (in which, it should be said, I worked very hard), I sold something like $9,000 worth of product to mostly middle-class families. It's not because I sold a lot of $700 sets, but because I sold $50 here, $100 there, and $250 somewhere else. And that's the rub: it's a great job provided you're willing to put in the work, but it's not easy. Simple, yes, but not easy. And if you're uncomfortable with public speaking, it'll be that much more difficult.

In a lot of ways, my experience with Cutco prepped me well for what I've been doing more recently. The personal interaction, listening to and assessing the needs of others, and eventually training and managing others... these are all skills that have come in handy as I work on political campaigns, and I have no doubt they have helped set me above the rest. It's been just a year and a half since I started out in political campaigns as a volunteer. In that time, I've gone from volunteering, to being paid to organize volunteers, to managing an entire fundraising operation, to now looking at possibly managing an entire campaign. On the previous campaign I worked on, where I was doing the fundraising, we hired another former Cutco sales rep and assistant manager, and unsurprisingly he was one of the most skilled organizers we had, and he was also great at making fundraising calls.

Anyway, I think it's a great experience, but it's not for everyone. I encourage everyone to try it out in earnest and follow the program, and if you decide it's not for you then that's cool: sales is a tough job, even when it's as simple as Cutco. But if you try it out and enjoy it, there's a lot of good experience to be had, not to mention good money opportunities.

It's a great product too (otherwise I wouldn't have put my efforts behind it). Over my three years, I accumulated pretty much the entire cutlery line, along with a few other items. I still enjoy using them.
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Old 07-08-2009, 10:23 AM   #17 (permalink)
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I worked for Cutco for two summers and it is exactly as Smeth describes. If you are willing to put in the time you will get the sales.

Real life sales is just like that. You have to knock on doors, work on referrals and make 10 sales calls / demos for every sale (which is a decent average).

Cutco taught me a lot and I had no issues with how it was done. I didn't expect a free lunch out of it though so I worked hard and was successfull.

great knives too, I still have mine like 15 years later.
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Old 07-08-2009, 11:13 AM   #18 (permalink)
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I Sold Cutco years ago when I was going to Tech School and needed some extra cash, it's a great company with great products. As with ANY sales you have to put in time to make a sale, if you think you can just set an appointment, do a demo and make $200. You will be one of those supporting Cutco by purchasing the demo set. If you follow the training and work, really work, you will make good money selling a good product.

I worked for them back in the early 90's and made good money doing 25 demo's a week. I still have my demo set and use it daily. Two of my knives have never been sharpened and still cut like a razor. My mom bought a set back in the day too. Recently she bought a $2200 set of rolled steel knives that she's been using for the last few of months, they now need to be sharpened and she's asking for her Cutco knives back (she gave them to me when she bought the new set). Not a bad deal considering she prefers a $900 set of knives to a $2200 set. Oh yeah, it's going to cost her $7/knife to have the new ones sharpened (can only be done with diamond sharpener due to the hardness of the steel), there are 14 knives in the set, you do the math. I just sent all of her Cutco knives to be sharpened (by Cutco) it costs NOTHING except shipping (about $12, for 17 knives). That's after 15 years vs. about 8 months for the rolled steel. And they replaced one for half price that could not be salvaged. She had some one try to sharpen it who was unfamiliar with the edge design Cutco uses and they destroyed the edge.

Overall, the Cutco knives have proven to be outstanding. I would recommend them to any one. And the company stands behind their product for life, who else does that these days? In the years during and since selling these knives, I've never met a dissatisfied customer, only dissatisfied former sales reps. So it all comes down to you. The product is solid.

And I have to call a BULLSHIT! On the traveling sales rep part, I worked for over 2 years and never left the county I live in.

Now don't get the impression this is easy work. To make those 25 appointments a week I had to make around 250 phone calls and of those 25 appointments I averaged 5 sets sold and worked 45-50 hrs a week. I wouldn't call it easy, but the money's good.


Good luck in whatever you decide to do.


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Old 07-08-2009, 11:36 AM   #19 (permalink)
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I worked for Vector selling Cutco. Let me say right up front, I am not a salesman. As such I was not as successful as I could have been.

Cutco is a decent knife. It is not a forged knife, and therefore will never perform like a high quality forged knife. It does perform excellent for a stamped knife. I've had my knives for 15 years, and they are still performing well. I am happy with them for the $150.00ish I payed. They have held their edge very well.

I knew what I was in for when I signed up, so I don't have much negative to say. If you're willing to put in the work, you'll gain the rewards. Don't buy into the illusion that you're gonna make millions, and understand that to make a living at it, you're gonna have to work really hard. If you don't enjoy sales, DO NOT do this.
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Old 07-08-2009, 11:59 AM   #20 (permalink)
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I've never worked for Cutco, but thought this ought to be emphasised:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daval
Real life sales is just like that. You have to knock on doors, work on referrals and make 10 sales calls / demos for every sale (which is a decent average).
Honestly. Stamp that on your forehead.

I'm currently in a sales position, and flatter myself that I'm pretty good at it. The bottom line is that it's a numbers game and you have to approach it as such. If you get 250 leads, and out of those 250 leads you make 25 contacts, and out of those 25 contacts you make 10 sales.. well, that's just how it goes.

Sales is by it's nature a shotgun approach. You chase as many leads as possible to sift through and find the few who are interested.

Having said that, there is also a lot of technique to sales. Your 25 contacts are the ones who are willing to give you the time to show them how they can benefit from your product, and that's where your own personality and skill comes in. As a consumer, my thought is going to immediately be to wonder why I should spend $200 on your knives when I can go down to the big box store and get a knife set for $40. Your job as a salesman is going to be to show your contact what they get for the extra $160, and why it's worth it.

And that right there is sales in a nutshell. You create desire by showing the benefit. Prove to the customer that their money is being well spent and they won't mind spending it.

Sales is not an easy gig. People get into it, and they see the success stories. The company who's hiring you is in the business of marketing, so of course they're going to show you the success stories. They sell you on the job so that you can go make them money. But then the folks who expect easy money get dissatisfied; they feel like they've been lied to, because they have come to the conclusion that it's easy money and it's not. It's bloody hard work, it's stressful, it's mentally and emotionally exhausting. It takes a very specific type of personality to thrive with this kind of work.

I trust SecretMethod70 enough that if he says the company's legit, I say go for it. Just understand the type of work you're getting into, is all.
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Old 07-08-2009, 12:18 PM   #21 (permalink)
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I agree with both Martian and Daval. I've worked in sales. I've even been formally educated in sales. It doesn't matter how you learn to sell, the fundamentals will remain the same, and they've been described above.

To boil it down for you:

Sales is about playing the numbers game: you need to get through a number of nos before you get to yes.

You aren't selling knives. You're selling Cutco, and you're selling yourself. We can easily assume your prospective buyers already have knives.
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Old 07-08-2009, 12:30 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Sorry, I was thinking of Vector Marketing, who SOLD Cutco knives. I've never heard anything about Cutco themselves. Vector on the other hand, they're notorious for their scams;

Quote:
In the past, the company admitted to fraud in settlements with the Australian Consumer and Competition Commission (1999), Wisconsin Consumer Protection Dept (1994), and Arizona Attorney General (1992). In 1992, 940 Wisconsin Vector Marketing recruits were surveyed and the survey found nearly half of the recruits earned no pay or lost money while working for Vector.

Recently the co-founder of SAVE (Students Against Vector Exploitation) a group formed by students to fight the Vector Marketing scam, won a case with the New York Department of Labor, proving that Vector violated the independent contractor- client relationship, making her an employee. This breach of contract required Vector to compensate for her training.
I remember looking at the time and finding hundreds of thousands of hits on "Vector Marketing Scam."
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Old 07-08-2009, 12:40 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Heh, about Vector.... in the days before everything could be found out about people on the Internet, I had driven over 200km for an "interview/orientation" day for "Vector Marketing." It was for a "career in promotions," or whatever.

I had just graduated from a 3-year college marketing program, and was eager to start a career. I went to them, followed a bunch of college kids around a suburb while they tried to get people to agree to a free home security system to help promote them to the neighbourhood.

At this point, I was thinking, "You've got to be fucking kidding me.... "

After that I took some stupid test, after which they told me how awesome I was and that I had a lot of potential to be very successful.

On the drive home, I kept thinking to myself, "What a fucking joke.... "
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Old 07-08-2009, 12:53 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Vector Marketing is still the company that sells Cutco, it's just easier to say Cutco. While I don't doubt the info quoted above, I find it interesting that I only ever see such info cited on anti-Vector websites. Nonetheless, I've heard some of the horror stories, and they've always involved an unscrupulous branch manager not doing what he's supposed to and taking advantage of his position. It's probably a reason why the company revised the branch manager program shortly after I worked there. Wisconsin is also notoriously anti-direct marketing: when I worked with Vector there was only one office in the entire state of Wisconsin (despite having multiple offices in all 49 other states). That said, it was a pilot office where they tested out a lot of new approaches that eventually became the official way of doing things around 2004. Again, as with any company, mistakes are made, and bad people end up being hired, but 1) I don't think the mistakes were malicious on the company's part, 2) from my perspective it seems they've become much better at preventing such mistakes over the past 10 years, and 3) relative to other companies I think Vector has a pretty clean record.

The actual company program - not saying anything for the bad seeds who might occasionally end up as branch managers - is good enough that they work with the business schools of Illinois State University and Purdue University among others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Vector is a member of the Direct Selling Association and the Better Business Bureau.[6] In 2006, Vector became a National Advisory Board member of DECA.

A strict promote-from-within policy[8] allows successful individuals an opportunity for advancement. Those that are selected can go through Vector's management training program after beginning at the bottom entry level position of a sales representative. Many Vector offices are managed by recent college graduates, and assistant managers are generally college students, although the company does have a Branch manager program that allows current students to open and run an office while on summer break.

Vector Marketing possesses an advisory board currently consisting of seven college professors: Dr. Joseph Hair (Kennesaw State University), Dr. Victoria Crittenden (Boston College), Dr. David Downey (Purdue University), Dr. Robert Peterson (University of Texas), Dr. Mike Williams (Illinois State University), Dr. Derek Hassay (University of Calgary), and Dr. Deborah MacInnis (University of Southern California). These board members "assist in evaluating and enhancing Vector's sales, training, and promotional programs for college students and sales representatives."

The training seminar that Vector representatives attend to start their careers is also offered as a class at univeristies around the country including Illinois State University, which is located in Chicago. [9] Professor Jill Ataway, who teaches the class with help from the Chicago Division Manager Mike Muriel, emphasizes that selling Cutco gives students "the opportunity to find out what it is like to take the theory from the classroom and apply it to a real-world sales environment" [9]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baraka_Guru View Post
Heh, about Vector.... in the days before everything could be found out about people on the Internet, I had driven over 200km for an "interview/orientation" day for "Vector Marketing." It was for a "career in promotions," or whatever.

I had just graduated from a 3-year college marketing program, and was eager to start a career. I went to them, followed a bunch of college kids around a suburb while they tried to get people to agree to a free home security system to help promote them to the neighbourhood.

At this point, I was thinking, "You've got to be fucking kidding me.... "

After that I took some stupid test, after which they told me how awesome I was and that I had a lot of potential to be very successful.

On the drive home, I kept thinking to myself, "What a fucking joke.... "
I'm curious when this was. Since the 80s, Vector has only sold Cutco and has been the only company to sell Cutco, but it may have been different before that. I know that early on, Vector was just one of many companies that sold Cutco, and perhaps they sold other products, I don't know. Vector was, by far, the most successful at selling Cutco though, so Cutco bought Vector and it became the official sales branch of the company.
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Last edited by SecretMethod70; 07-08-2009 at 12:57 PM..
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Old 07-08-2009, 01:54 PM   #25 (permalink)
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I was never really passionate about sales so I didn't really enjoy it that much. If you like sales and that's your thing it's a good experience.

I just wanted to enjoy my summer before I started college for engineering, and they made it seem like it would be really easy to earn extra money. It's not quite as easy as they made it out to be so I didn't have a great experience with it. I was able to hone communication skills so it wasn't an entirely negative experience.
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Old 07-14-2009, 06:17 PM   #26 (permalink)
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So far I'm 3 weeks in and have earned $1,000+

I knew what I was getting into when I started it and SecretMethod70 pretty much summed up all the misconceptions and revealed the truth.

I feel like the job is going well so far and the demo kit is worth the $150 I paid for it (roughly $600 worth of product) and I have also earned about 10 other knives during a "Fast Start" (first 10 days) contest.

The knives are legit and pretty much sell themselves, which is why they target college kids with no sales experience.
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Old 07-15-2009, 02:51 PM   #27 (permalink)
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I have a question. When you first start working for them, do they end up giving you referrals to other customers or do friends and family have to give you their connections?
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Old 07-15-2009, 06:42 PM   #28 (permalink)
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What a coincidence that I spied this thread today. Just last night, a nephew sold me a set of table knives. I'll call him for more when the funds permit. Nice products, and it was a hoot seeing the kid in sales mode. He's only a few weeks into the program, but he showed QW and me a side of his personality we hardly could have predicted. He's already sold a coupla grand worth of product. Good for him. He seems to like it.

The "star" of his presentation is a 45 year old knife that had belonged to my mother, still pristine and quite sharp! Seems one of my older brothers had sold Cutco. Everyone in the family knew about it, but me, so it appears.
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:04 AM   #29 (permalink)
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Actually the place i just started at for vector they are not charging me a dime for the demo set of course if people start stealing it they have to but for now they are really being nice about it! Its really hard to come up with people to see if others wont give referrals so make sure you know people!!
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Old 06-17-2011, 08:59 PM   #30 (permalink)
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I am a Cutco Sales representative. Visit my page, or email me for questions. I am available for appointments in San Francisco.
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Old 06-18-2011, 05:55 AM   #31 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyuk View Post
I am a Cutco Sales representative. Visit my page, or email me for questions. I am available for appointments in San Francisco.
You must be a special kind of stupid to post that in this thread. Someone banned you before I got to you, so I'll just hope that you come back and see my wish that you die in a fire, spammer.
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