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Old 06-04-2003, 04:12 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Today in History: June 4, 1919 - 19th Amendment, VERY important

<a target=new href="http://www.historychannel.com/tdih/">Brought to you by the History Channel - <b>LINK</b></a>

<b>1919 Congress passes the 19th Amendment</b>


The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing women the right to vote, is passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification.

The women's suffrage movement was founded in the mid-19th century by women who had become politically active through
their work in the abolitionist and temperance movements. In July 1848, 240 woman suffragists, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, met in Seneca Falls, New York, to assert the right of women to vote. Female enfranchisement was still largely opposed by most Americans, and the distraction of the North-South conflict and subsequent Civil War precluded further discussion. During the Reconstruction Era, the 15th Amendment was adopted, granting African American men the right to vote, but the Republican-dominated Congress failed to expand its progressive radicalism into the sphere of gender.

In 1869, the National Woman Suffrage Association, led by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, was formed to push for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Another organization, the American Woman Suffrage Association, led by Lucy Stone, was organized in the same year to work through the state legislatures. In 1890, these two societies were united as the National American Woman Suffrage Association. That year, Wyoming became the first state to grant women the right to vote.

By the beginning of the 20th century, the role of women in American society was changing drastically; women were working more, receiving a better education, bearing fewer children, and several states had authorized female suffrage. In 1913, the National Woman's party organized the voting power of these enfranchised women to elect congressional representatives who supported woman suffrage, and by 1916 both the Democratic and Republican parties openly endorsed female enfranchisement. In 1919, the 19th Amendment, which stated that "the rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex," passed both houses of Congress and was sent to the states for ratification. On August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the amendment, giving it the two-thirds majority of state ratification necessary to make it the law of the land. Eight days later, the 19th Amendment took effect.


<a target=new href="http://www.historychannel.com/tdih/oldwest.html"><b>1876 Express train crosses the nation in 83 hours</b></a> - That any human being could travel across the entire nation in less than four days was inconceivable to previous generations of Americans. During the early 19th century, when Thomas Jefferson first dreamed of an American nation stretching from "sea to shining sea," it took the president 10 days to travel the 225 miles from Monticello to Philadelphia via carriage…

<a target=new href="http://www.historychannel.com/tdih/wwii.html"><b>1942 The Battle of Midway begins</b></a> -
The attack on Midway was an unmitigated disaster for the Japanese, resulting in the loss of 322 aircraft and 3,500 men, and more importantly 4 aircraft carriers. The turning point of the pacific war
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Old 06-04-2003, 04:29 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Indeed this was a monumental change to the rights of women everywhere.
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Old 06-04-2003, 06:44 AM   #3 (permalink)
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http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/proj...nthkobach.html

I remembered learning about how hard the amendment was to pass in Congress itself. The passage posted doesn't cover this, and I thought I'd find something that did. The above link describes the process quite well. I went looking for it cause I wanted to make a point about how much resistance women met along the way. Today, we kinda say, ho-hum then the passed the nineteenth. But the passage was a display of democracy at its best and worst.

Here is a quote form the link:
On January 10, 1918, the House of Representatives proposed a federal constitutional amendment with the required two-thirds majority. However, the resistance of Southern Democrats in the Senate delayed a vote in the second chamber until October 1, when the amendment failed by two votes. After falling short again on February 10, 1919, the suffrage amendment was finally approved by the Senate on June 4, 1919.

Takes alot of opposition to stall a social movement, yet there were many in Congress who did not approve of the women's rights movement. Makes you wonder, huh?
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Old 06-04-2003, 06:44 AM   #4 (permalink)
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great day indeed
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Old 06-04-2003, 07:56 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally posted by gov135
http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/proj...nthkobach.html


Here is a quote form the link:
On January 10, 1918, the House of Representatives proposed a federal constitutional amendment with the required two-thirds majority. However, the resistance of Southern Democrats in the Senate delayed a vote in the second chamber until October 1, when the amendment failed by two votes. After falling short again on February 10, 1919, the suffrage amendment was finally approved by the Senate on June 4, 1919.

Takes alot of opposition to stall a social movement, yet there were many in Congress who did not approve of the women's rights movement. Makes you wonder, huh?
Thanks for the Link - i had no idea
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Old 06-04-2003, 07:58 AM   #6 (permalink)
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I think Senator Byrd voted against it. ;-)
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Old 06-04-2003, 08:28 AM   #7 (permalink)
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i can name of a whole bunch of today-repubican, ex-democrats that would've voted against it.

dem's today are much more for women's rights than repub's. a whole lot more women in congress under democrats than republicans.
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Old 06-04-2003, 08:52 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Originally posted by The_Dude
i can name of a whole bunch of today-repubican, ex-democrats that would've voted against it.

dem's today are much more for women's rights than repub's. a whole lot more women in congress under democrats than republicans.
Dude - Robert Byrd was in the KKK
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Old 06-04-2003, 09:02 AM   #9 (permalink)
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History shows that Republicans have done much more to benefit all races and women's rights than have Demoncrats.
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Old 06-04-2003, 09:57 AM   #10 (permalink)
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The terms "Republican" and "Democrat" once meant something very different than they do today. Abraham Lincoln was a Republican. Today he would most likely be a Democrat. Because of that, Southerners used to be extremely Democratic, simply because the Republican party was Lincoln's party, and so they all voted Dem. But over time, the parties have changed, their platforms have changed, and now the South votes Republican.

Anyways, that's besides the point. The point is that on June 4th, 1919, women were granted the right to vote. Thank God we were finally allowed to have our say...I'm not quite sure what I would do without a voice.

Now if only we could get everyone who has the right to vote to go to the polls, we'll be set It makes me sad that so many people have a right that they take so for granted.
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