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Old 05-09-2005, 09:25 AM   #1 (permalink)
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The NFL forbids coaches to wear suits on the sideline

Quote:
Coach Mike Nolan recently petitioned the NFL to allow him to wear a suit on the sidelines during game days.

"To me, it's professional. I think it's respectful," Nolan said. "There was certainly no deal, no one came to me, there was nothing to gain. I wasn't trying to put the spotlight on me. But what I was trying to say, there's somebody in charge and this is what they look like."

The league turned Nolan down. Head coaches must wear the NFL-sanctioned team garb.

"There were marketing issues and sales issues, all that stuff," Nolan lamented. Beyond wanting to look the part of a man in charge, Nolan also viewed it as a tribute to his father, Dick, who was the coach of the 49ers from 1968-75.

"I must say looking at the pictures of my dad -- they are all around my office -- I thought, 'I'm going to do that.' But they are not going to let me."

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...PGDCCLVFJ1.DTL
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Old 05-09-2005, 10:32 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I just saw this on ESPN today. I'm sure the thinking is that if a coach is wearing a suit and not a fancy team shirt, it will somehow cut into sales of said team shirts. Honestly, though, just about everyone I know is huge Steelers nut that owns tons of merchandise but none of it was ever bought because Bill Cower was wearing it. I don't think any coach in the NFL has fanbase interested in looking like them.
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Old 05-09-2005, 11:26 AM   #3 (permalink)
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I remember the 2 greatest NFL Coaches wearing their hat and suit every game. PAUL BROWN and TOM LANDRY, he was awesome. Everyone else I seem to recall as just wearing sweaters, Noll, Shula, Rutigliano, Parcells, etc....
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Old 05-09-2005, 01:40 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Nah, I think the whole thing has to do with Bill Belicheck's ego. If the league allows coaches to wear suits, he'll look like a schmuck when he goes out to shake hands with a well-dressed fellow when he's wearing his grungy hooded sweatshirt. I'm telling you, it's a conspiracy theory.
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Old 05-09-2005, 06:29 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Another wardrobe decision that make the NFL heads look incredibly stupid (remember when Jake Plummer wanted to wear the Pat Tillman sticker on his helmet?).
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Old 05-09-2005, 07:22 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I say, wear the suit. What are they gonna do, fine him for trying to present an air of professionalism and class while on the sideline? Yea, I know they will, and he'll get a warning not to do it again. But sometimes I think statements need to be made.
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Old 05-09-2005, 08:54 PM   #7 (permalink)
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I've been wondering why coaches stopped wearing suits for a while now, but I never thought it was a rule that you couldn't. How asinine. This is worse than the Plummer/Tillman thing and only letting the Ravens honor Unitas after he died with any change to uniforms. How much money can the league need? I would personally like to see a trend towards suits for coaches.
Does anyone know when the rule went into effect? Or who was the first coach to not wear a suit. I've got my money on Madden.
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Old 05-10-2005, 04:59 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I think they should wear full pads and a helmet. Why not? I mean, baseball managers wear spikes and a uniform...
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Old 05-10-2005, 05:13 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Or how about this for a solution? (forgive me, I did this in about 2 minutes):

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Old 05-10-2005, 05:50 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Why not just market team ties and dress socks to go with the suits? The coaches get to wear a suit if they want to and they can accessorize with the team specific tie or belt or socks. Those items could be sold to the public for those freaks that actually want to dress like an NFL coach. I agree that most of the NFL merchandising has very little to do with what a particular coach is wearing on the sidelines.
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Old 05-12-2005, 11:49 AM   #11 (permalink)
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As a basketball fan, I've always hated the fact that the coaches have to wear suits to the games. They're a part of the team, and should be able to wear a jacket and hat with their team logo on it. Then again, if they want to wear a suit, they should be able to do that, too.

I say instead of do something stupid and get fined, Coach Mike Nolan should send in an official petition every single day to get his point across.
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Old 05-12-2005, 12:22 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Coming from Canada, I can't remember any hockey coach above the pee wee levels not wearing a suit. It always seems wierd, when watching baseball, to see men in their 60s wearing the dress of the players.

I think the current NFL coach garb is partly about practicality. I would want to be wearing a suit during a snow storm a Foxborough. Though I see no reason why suits aren't allowed at indoor stadiums, or calm, warm days.
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Old 05-12-2005, 07:43 PM   #13 (permalink)
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I think that they should be allowed to wear a suit. Nolan is right, it's very professional. Like CandleInTheDark, I'm a hockey fan and the coaches and assistant coaches are all wearing suits. If the NFL coaches don't want to wear a suit, then fine, but let them if they want to.
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Old 05-13-2005, 12:29 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CandleInTheDark
I think the current NFL coach garb is partly about practicality. I would want to be wearing a suit during a snow storm a Foxborough. Though I see no reason why suits aren't allowed at indoor stadiums, or calm, warm days.
Absolutely. I mean, it's not like you're not going to know who the guy is if he isn't slathered head to toe in team colors.


"Oh my god! Is that Andy Reid....I didn't recognize him without his "Eagles" pullover..."
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Old 05-13-2005, 01:01 PM   #15 (permalink)
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What a ridiculous policy.
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Old 05-13-2005, 10:09 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Hmmm...maybe it's an indoors/outdoors thing. Notice how basketball and hockey (both played professionally indoors) has their coaches in suits, while baseball and football (both played professionally outdoors) has their coaches in comfortable garb?

Hmmmmmm...
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Old 05-14-2005, 11:25 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tooth
What a ridiculous policy.
This encompasses everything I wanted to say in this thread... ironically enough this response is much longer than had I originally chosen to just write "what a ridiculous policy"
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Old 05-14-2005, 01:07 PM   #18 (permalink)
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It's a business thing. The NFL sells coaches apparel as well. Even at the college level, you can buy NCAA authentic coaches gear.
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Old 05-15-2005, 06:41 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pan6467
I remember the 2 greatest NFL Coaches wearing their hat and suit every game. PAUL BROWN and TOM LANDRY, he was awesome. Everyone else I seem to recall as just wearing sweaters, Noll, Shula, Rutigliano, Parcells, etc....
Paul Brown and Tom Landry were the two names that came to mind for me as well. They both epitomize class, dignity, and good sportsmanship. The first image that comes to mind for both of them is watching them on the sidlines on cold sunday's wearing their suits, top coats and fedoras. Rest in peace gentlemen. Your proud legacies live on.

Quote from the Pro Football Hall of Fame Archive:

Quote:
Paul Brown, perhaps more than any other person, is responsible for making pro football coaching the exact science it is today. When he organized the Cleveland Browns in the new All-America Football Conference in 1946, he started doing things no other pro coach had tried.

Brown built a pro football dynasty in Cleveland, posting a 167-53-8 record, four AAFC titles, three NFL crowns and only one losing season in 17 years. In the four seasons the Browns operated in the AAFC, they lost just four games. When the Browns joined the NFL in 1950, they continued their winning ways playing in the next six championship games and winning the title in 1950, 1954, and 1955.


Quote from the Sporting News:

Quote:
Tom Landry always appeared stoic on the field in his trademark hat and sports jacket. He never changed his game time garb over 29 seasons as coach (1960-1989), the second longest tenure all-time for an NFL coach, behind only George Halas of the Bears.
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Old 05-17-2005, 08:43 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Wow - I had no idea. I think this is a terrible call on the NFL's part. A head football coach is the consumate professional and I don't see any problem with looking the part.

Very strange. One thought that went through my head is where the line is. I mean it doesn't seem that they force you to wear "NFL" pants. So what if you wore dress pants, shoes, shirt, tie and a classy NFL sweater or something and then wore the coat over it (like the photo above this post). Dunno.
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Old 05-18-2005, 10:06 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityOfAngels
Hmmm...maybe it's an indoors/outdoors thing. Notice how basketball and hockey (both played professionally indoors) has their coaches in suits, while baseball and football (both played professionally outdoors) has their coaches in comfortable garb?

Hmmmmmm...
You got a point. It kinda reminds me in school or church or other places where people couldn't wear hats...

Wait a min..Hockey and Basketball were invented by Canadians! Maybe we got a better sense of fashion than the Americans

Besides, Football and Baseball is still played indoor. Skydome for starters
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Old 05-19-2005, 09:57 AM   #22 (permalink)
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Remeber, this is the league that fines you if your socks aren't pulled up afr enough.

I also think they should just market a team tie or put a lgo on the back of his jacket, but Mr. Tagliabue rarely asks me what I think he should do.
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Old 05-19-2005, 01:22 PM   #23 (permalink)
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I know that for baseball, a manager has the choice to not wear the uniform, they just can't go out on the field to change pitchers, they would have to send someone else out to do it who has a uniform on. Connie Mack, the great A's manager always wore suits to the games, but never went on the field, and I assume the rules haven't changed in the last 50 years about this issue.
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Old 05-21-2005, 05:11 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForgottenKnight
I think that they should be allowed to wear a suit. Nolan is right, it's very professional. Like CandleInTheDark, I'm a hockey fan and the coaches and assistant coaches are all wearing suits. If the NFL coaches don't want to wear a suit, then fine, but let them if they want to.
Hell no! Then we wouldn't be treated to fatasses like Tommy LaSorda running around in a uniform!
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Old 05-26-2005, 08:31 PM   #25 (permalink)
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The NFL, NBA, and MLB are all complete jokes. They are all about marketing and doing what they think will earn them more money. Same goes with all professional sports that's why it's called entertainment. It's getting so bad that now the college "sports" are starting to change their games and rules to market to fans. In the future we will no longer have sports but just entertainment.
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Old 06-01-2005, 05:13 AM   #26 (permalink)
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Football coaches should be able to wear suits, like the days of Vince Lombardi. It should at least be optional, it brings a little bit of class on the sidelines.
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Old 06-14-2005, 08:49 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Just saw this thread, and I just want to say that it's BULLSHIT!
American professional athletes do not wear advertisements on their uniforms, save for race car drivers, but coaches do not get the same treatment.
Dan Reeves was the last NFL coach to wear a sportcoat, and Mike Tice the last with a tie. There are enough indoor stadiums in the NFL that indoor/outdoor argument is silly. I wish I could find a picture of Landry and Lombardi at the Ice Bowl, outdoors in the subzero weather that gave the frozen tundra of Lambeaugh Field its name, dressed in overcoats, not ski-jackets. Instead, you'll have to settle for:

Here's Landry's ESPN biography:
Quote:
Mr. Cowboy
By Mike Puma
Special to ESPN.com



"Coach Landry was the entire image for America's Team. He represented the very best in all of us," says Hall of Fame quarterback Roger Staubach on ESPN Classic's SportsCentury series.



He might have been the only coach identifiable by his silhouette. But Tom Landry's trademark fedora was only part of what separated him from the others. Few coaches in NFL history won as many games, earned as much respect and became the embodiment of one franchise the way Landry did.


In 29 seasons as the Dallas Cowboys head coach, "The Great Stoneface" seldom changed his expression. His stare alone could make 300-pound linemen cower in fear. But Dallas' opponents weren't smiling, either. Under Landry, the Cowboys became "America's Team," the NFL standard in the 1970s after emerging as a force in the late 1960s.


Landry's teams went 270-178-6, making him the third winningest coach in NFL history. Under him, the Cowboys won two Super Bowls, five NFC championships, 13 division titles and set an NFL record with 20 consecutive winning seasons, starting in 1966. As a defensive assistant with the Giants, Landry teamed with offensive assistant Vince Lombardi to help win an NFL championship in 1956.


But Landry's innovations, such as the flex defense and the multiple offense, are almost as much his legacy as his leadership skills. It was Landry's teams that perfected the shotgun offense, a formation first used and discarded by the San Francisco 49ers in the 1960s.


"I honestly believe his contributions to the technical side of the game were greater than anyone who has ever coached," said Mike Ditka, a tight end and assistant coach under Landry.

The Cowboys' decline under Landry began in 1986 with a 7-9 season. Two years later, they finished 3-13 and the following February were sold to Arkansas oil man Jerry Jones, who fired Landry.

A deeply religious man - he became a born-again Christian in 1959 - Landry rarely let down his guard. "People ask me, did I ever see coach Landry smile?" former Cowboys running back Walt Garrison said. "And I tell them, 'No, but I only played there nine years.' "

The third of Ray and Ruth Landry's four children, Tom was born on Sept. 11, 1924 in Mission, Tex. Ray ran an auto-repair shop and served as a volunteer fireman and Sunday School superintendent. Ruth was heavily involved with the First United Methodist Church.

The 6-foot-1, 180-pound Landry emerged as a standout quarterback, fullback and safety at Mission High School, leading the team to a 12-0 record and a regional championship as a senior.

Declining scholarship offers from SMU, Rice and Mississippi, he attended Texas in 1942 while also enlisting in the Army reserves. After one semester, he was called into World War II as a co-pilot and tail gunner on a B-17 with the Eighth Air Force. Landry flew 30 missions, including one in which he was forced to crash-land his plane in Belgium after a bombing run in Germany. In November 1945, Landry was discharged as a first lieutenant.

He returned to Texas, earning All-Southwest Conference honors as a junior fullback for a team that defeated Alabama in the 1948 Sugar Bowl. As a senior, he rushed for 117 yards on 17 carries in a victory over Georgia in the Orange Bowl.

After marrying his college sweetheart Alicia Wiggs, and earning a degree in business in 1949, Landry signed with the New York Yankees of the upstart All-America Football Conference as a punter and defensive back. When the league folded the following year, Landry joined the NFL's Giants. His best season came in 1954, when he had eight interceptions and was named All-Pro while also serving as an assistant coach.

After one more year as a player-coach, Landry quit playing and assumed control of the defense on a coaching staff that included Lombardi. The Giants won the NFL championship, routing the Chicago Bears 47-7 in the title game.

With a 4-3 defensive scheme that featured Sam Huff as the middle linebacker, the Giants became more celebrated for defense than offense. That defensive dominance continued through the decade.

Still, Landry couldn't write his own coaching ticket. In 1958, he interviewed for the Texas A&M head-coaching job vacated by Bear Bryant, but wasn't offered the position. The next year, the Houston Oilers wanted to make him their first head coach, but Landry passed, believing the fledgling American Football League a risky proposition.

Landry waited. Finally, on Dec. 27, 1959, he signed a five-year personal-services contract with Clint Murchison Jr. and Bedford Wynne that paid him $34,500 annually. The intention was to name Landry head coach once the pair was awarded an NFL expansion franchise. A month later, the Dallas Cowboys were born and Landry was their coach.

But he was hardly an instant hit. The Cowboys went 0-11-1 in their first season, and improvement came slowly.

Following the 1963 season, the team was 13-38-3, making Landry's firing seem imminent. But ownership responded with the ultimate vote of confidence, giving Landry, who had a year remaining on his contract, a 10-year extension.

Dallas' first winning campaign came in 1966, when it went 10-3-1 and won the Eastern Conference. However, the season ended with an excruciating 34-27 loss to Lombardi's Packers in the NFL title game.

The following season concluded with an even tougher loss. After going 9-5 to win the Capitol Division and then routing the Browns, 52-14, to win the Eastern Conference, the Cowboys lost the "Ice Bowl" to the Packers, 21-17, when Bart Starr scored with 13 seconds left.

In 1968 and 1969, the Cowboys won two more division titles but lost to Cleveland both years for the Eastern Conference crown. In the 1970 season, Landry finally made it to the Super Bowl. However, the Cowboys were defeated, 16-13, by Baltimore on Dan O'Brien's last-second field goal.

The following year they went all the way. They won their last seven regular-season games to finish 11-3, beat Minnesota and San Francisco in the playoffs to repeat as NFC champions, and then dominated Miami, 24-3, in Super Bowl VI.

The Cowboys' streak of eight straight playoff appearances ended with an 8-6 season in 1974, but Landry guided the team back to the postseason the following year. Roger Staubach's "Hail Mary" pass to Drew Pearson beat the Vikings, en route to a berth in Super Bowl X, a 21-17 loss to Pittsburgh.

Two seasons later, the Cowboys were champions again, crushing Denver 27-10 in Super Bowl XII. Their bid to win consecutive Super Bowls was thwarted by the Steelers, who won 35-31.

In the 1981 season, Dallas seemed headed to Super Bowl XVI, but Dwight Clark made "The Catch" for the 49ers in the final minute. The next year, the Cowboys again lost in the NFC title game, this time to Washington.

After finishing fourth in the NFC East in 1984, the Cowboys rebounded the next year to go 10-6 for Landry's last division title. But then Landry and the team fell on hard times, going 17-30 from 1986 to 1988.

Landry wanted to coach into the 1990s, but on Feb. 25, 1989, Jones bought the Cowboys from H.R. "Bum" Bright and then interrupted Landry's golf game to inform the coach he was being replaced by Jimmy Johnson.

Angered by the move, Landry held a grudge against Jones until 1993. The cold war ended when Landry agreed to appear at Texas Stadium for induction into the Cowboys' ring of honor.

After his forced retirement, Landry became a limited owner of the San Antonio Riders of the World League of American Football and a pitch man for Abercrombie & Fitch's classic clothing line. In 1990, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.


In May 1999, Landry was diagnosed with leukemia. He died on Feb. 12, 2000 in Dallas. He was 75.


"The whole Cowboys image came from him," Staubach said. "Tom will always make the Dallas Cowboys more than a football team."
For those of you that read Greg Easterbrook's Tuesday Morning Quarterback, you know that he frequently references the "Football gods" that frown upon silly shit and over-celebration, and will smite the teams that exhibit such traits. If there are football gods, I dare say that Brown, Landry, and Lombardi are among them!
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