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Food Do you grill, bbq, smoke?

Discussion in 'Tilted Food' started by Borla, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. omega

    omega Very Tilted Donor

    Ugh. Wrecked a set of ribs. Way overcooked. Oh well, some of the meat of salvageable. I'll get it better next time.
     
  2. Borla

    Borla Moderator Staff Member Donor

    Been there, done that, unfortunately.

    On the bright side, I usually learn something each time I screw something up too. Live and learn.
     
  3. POPEYE

    POPEYE Very Tilted Donor

    Location:
    Tulsa
    Sandy and I agree on that the Smoke flavor is better than the sauce or sauces.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. Borla

    Borla Moderator Staff Member Donor

    I'm a firm believer that, with smoking, if you did your rub and your smoke right, you either don't need sauce, or you only need a hint of sauce.

    Not a huge fan of ribs or other bbq that have to rely on the sauce.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Borla

    Borla Moderator Staff Member Donor

    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 3
  6. I raise 3 steers each year so I have a lot of beef to grill, smoke..... The last 3 years I've taken the hearts, brisket, tongue and a few other cuts and brined them into corned beef then smoked it into pastrami. I've got a big chief tin smoker with a few mods, I took the thermostat and control from an oven and put a bigger burner in the big chief. I use a bigger pot to hold the wood chips so I get about 3 hours of smoke per load. After I brine the beef for 10+ days I wash it in cold running water for 6-8 hours. I rub it with a mix of stuff from a recipe I got online (google "close to Katz's") then smoke it at 170 for 8 hours then cook it for another 8 hours at 190-200. It comes out so moist and unbefuckinglievaby delicious.

    I use the whole brisket with the fat cap still on. It is kinda like beef bacon, it is easily the best pastrami I've ever eaten. The hearts are amazing, super lean. The tongues are probably my favourite, they're very very rich.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  7. Borla

    Borla Moderator Staff Member Donor


    I can't remember if I posted pics earlier in this thread or another thread, but I've done beef heart on the grill before. It is way better than I expected. Since it's a muscle, it tastes more like a roast than any organ meat.
     
  8. POPEYE

    POPEYE Very Tilted Donor

    Location:
    Tulsa

    you must be or have worked as a butcher. My Uncle Gene was a butcher, the man had arms and a chest Huge really. One time he was walking into the barn and the heifer kicked him in that chest. He went flying out the barn door, like in a movie. That man got up and went back in and still milked that cow. I also saw a horse bite him on his shoulder...My Uncle punched that horse in the face and his head actually jerked back from the force. He always seemed to have a hog hanging from a tree packed down with either salt or sugar. 3 steers is a lot of meat and work.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member Donor

    Location:
    Toronto
    It's grilling season again, finally.

    I don't normally grill all that much (because I'm lazy). But this year I intend to change that.

    Since I'm not that experienced in grilling steak, I recently came up with an easy-to-remember guideline for 1" steaks: 54-40.

    If you're Canadian, you'll recognize the reference:


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkh4qdxLFH0


    What does it mean?

    High heat; 5 minutes first side; 4 minutes second side; 140F internal temperature.

    I'll see if this works out. It's easy to remember anyway.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    You don't have to be Canadian. Why, I would bet that at least 10% of Americans get that.

    I remember the book from high school: 54° 40' or fight, The Transmogrification of a Toronto Vegetarian but I thought it meant that you cooked the steak for forty minutes at fifty four degrees.

    Centigrade degrees, of course.;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. POPEYE

    POPEYE Very Tilted Donor

    Location:
    Tulsa
    We skipped Sunday breakfast and just had coffee on the porch. Got to sleep in again, didn't get up till 7:30. I worked in the yard and Sandy grilled us some sausages, hamburgers, and Nathan hot dogs. The kids are coming out and it will be a good day today.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. omega

    omega Very Tilted Donor

    Smoked a couple shoulders today I bought from costco. So much more forgiving than ribs. I cooked them hot and fast again, and I really think that method works well. They were cooked at roughly 275-300 for the temp. I started my smoker at 12 and we were eating at just after 5. Meat had a good flavor and was very tender, even though I chopped it. I recommend hot and fast, having to only cook for 5 hours is such a treat and makes me more willing to do it more often. Still have a ton of leftovers,considering we ate less than half of one shoulder.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  13. POPEYE

    POPEYE Very Tilted Donor

    Location:
    Tulsa
    I prefer the flavour of the smoke, deep smoke, no sauce
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. omega

    omega Very Tilted Donor

    Smoked a turkey for thanksgiving. About 20 lbs, at 300 or so degrees. Turkey was only on the smoker for about 3.5 hours. Brought it up nicely to 165 degrees. Was finished too soon so I placed foil over it and then laid a couple bath towels over that. Over an hour later and it was still steaming when unwrapped. Came out most excellent.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  15. Leto

    Leto Slightly Tilted

    Location:
    Toronto
    Looking for recommendations on the best charcoal to use for BBQ-ing. I have recently come into possession of a Weber kettle charcoal grill, plus the starter chimney, and have used my first bag of lump charcoal which is called Oak Park ( I think). I wanted to stay away from briquettes. My first attempt yielded a steak that was tasty, but didn't have that nice caramelized sear on it. I took it off before it could get over cooked. I thought it was the charcoal brand, but I have since practiced with opening the vents to draw more air through which seems to have done the trick.

    have now enjoyed flavourful shrimp, calamari, grilled veggies and potatoes, corn and burgers. Not sure if I will ever go back to my propane Weber! I remember how convenient the propane was after struggling with the hibachi all through the '80s, but the chimney starter is a game changer.


    So, what brand and style of charcoal should I be on the look out for? I heard that Kingsford is THE name in the business.

    (PS - by BBQ I am using the term as canadians are want to do: using charcoal to grill food.)
     
    • Like Like x 2
  16. Japchae

    Japchae Very Tilted Donor

    I use natural charcoal pieces whenever possible. Most Home Depot-like stores, Fresh Markets, Whole Foods, etc type stores will carry them. I start them with a charcoal chimney, so there is no lighter fluid or funky-tasting stuff. The natural charcoal comes on chunks of wood material.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  17. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize. Donor

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    @Borla
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Borla

    Borla Moderator Staff Member Donor

    Using lump charcoal, as you did, is definitely my preferred choice. I haven't used briquettes in 12-15 years or more.

    As to the brand, it comes down to local availability and what you want to pay. There are some brands that do a really good job of giving larger chunks and less dust/crumbs, but they often come at a premium. Also, in my experience, how your local store handles the bags makes a huge impact as well. Places that leave them stacked on the pallet tend to have larger pieces and less dust/crumbs than places that manually restack them (the extra handling breaks the charcoal pieces inside the bag). I mean, if you were the 17yr old kid told to go stack bags of charcoal would you think to be gentle and careful to not break up the charcoal?

    The best resource I've found is this page of reviews:
    The Lump Charcoal Database Reviews -- Naked Whiz Charcoal Ceramic Cooking

    YMMV, but it gives you a decent rundown of most major brands.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  19. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize. Donor

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    BBQ Fails _ Cooking Fail Compilations 2018 - YouTube.jpg
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  20. Leto

    Leto Slightly Tilted

    Location:
    Toronto

    This is great! Thanks Borla. I have been buying the bags at my local Costco - and you are right, they are left on the pallet and the chunks are fairly large and intact.

    Thanks for the link!
     
    • Like Like x 1