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Doctor Assisted Death

Discussion in 'Tilted Philosophy, Politics, and Economics' started by Charlatan, Feb 26, 2016.

  1. Charlatan

    Charlatan sous les pavés, la plage

    Location:
    Temasek
    Last year, Canada's supreme court struck down the law preventing Doctor Assisted Death and gave the government a year's deadline to come up with a new policy/law to address this issue.

    The new Canadian government, after consultation, has prepared a bill that will eventually go to parliament to be voted into law. Long story short, it legalises doctor assisted death and mandates a number of rules for when it can happen and how it can happen (including age limits and the need of two assenting physicians).

    I recognise this is a complicated matter for many people and worry that it can be abused. That said, I do not see why someone with a terminal illness where they are in pain should have to continue to live with that pain (I am sure there are many other reasons as well).

    What do you think of doctor assisted death? Do you think it should be legal? Under what circumstances? If you don't, why not?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. rogue49

    rogue49 Tech Kung Fu Artist Staff Member

    Location:
    Baltimore/DC
    As long as there are a lot of checks...legal & medical by certified professionals...some waiting period...then I don't mind.
    Everyone is responsible for their own lives. And we shouldn't fear death.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. genuinemommy

    genuinemommy Moderator Staff Member

    I find it striking how common it is to euthanize pets, and yet the same option is unavailable for human loved ones.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. Japchae

    Japchae Very Tilted

    This is a professional goal of mine. To do the mandatory psych evaluations for Right-to-Die programs. I'm incredibly passionate about this issue. Stemming, of course, from my work in Peds palliative and hospice care. There is too much suffering in this world and I believe that those who do jot have hope, have the right to not be persecuted or punished for not wanting to endure agony or loss of dignity and self. Involvement of a physician can increase the humanity and dignity, and decrease the risk of botched attempts. One of the reasons we're moving to a state that supports this movement.

    Hubs and I already have our end-of-life plans, if needed. And this discussion happened years ago, long before we got married
     
    • Like Like x 3
  5. martian

    martian Server Monkey Staff Member

    Location:
    Mars

    Precisely this. If my dog is suffering with no hope of recovery I can put her down, but if grandma is suffering with no hope of recovery we just have to "let nature take it's course." The fuck is that?

    So long as precautions are taken to ensure the people going through with the procedure are of sound mind I'm all for it. I actually think reserving it for cases that are already terminal would be sensible. If someone is for sure no fooling going to die, why wouldn't you let them do it on their own terms?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. Japchae

    Japchae Very Tilted

    There is a very well researched psych interview and assessment battery required in states that allow this. You have to have enough cognitive understanding of your situation, your options, and the consequences of them. There has to be a certain level of capacity to make decisions, no evidence of influence from others, and no one can do it by proxy... e.g. Alzheimers without previous evaluation and directive. It's a good system, surprisingly.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  7. genuinemommy

    genuinemommy Moderator Staff Member

    Seems like there should be a certain point with dementia that the family should have a say in whether or not they want to continue watching their loved one deteriorate. My grandmother lived 8 years in a nursing home with alzheimers. The last couple of years she could barely even open her eyes and interact, even to hold a hand. It was an bizarre existence, occasional nonsensical mutterings, lots of pain. I doubt I would have chosen to put her down, but I can see why others should be given that same freedom.
     
  8. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize. Donor

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    I'm for it being legalized. As for the circumstances, that could be a long list.



    I'd be interested in reading more. Can you provide some links?
     
  9. Charlatan

    Charlatan sous les pavés, la plage

    Location:
    Temasek
    Interesting responses. I am surprised that there hasn't been a voice in the against camp.

    Perhaps that's a reflection of our increasingly left leaning board.
     
  10. genuinemommy

    genuinemommy Moderator Staff Member

    I haven't personally put down a pet. I prefer allowing nature to take its course. I don't see a scenario where I would abort a fetus, much less encourage a loved one to choose physician assisted suicide.

    But...

    Imposing ones morals on an entire country is itself immoral.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. martian

    martian Server Monkey Staff Member

    Location:
    Mars
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Charlatan

    Charlatan sous les pavés, la plage

    Location:
    Temasek
    I read that the other day. It was an excellent read.
     
  13. genuinemommy

    genuinemommy Moderator Staff Member

  14. Katia

    Katia Very Tilted

    Location:
    Earth
    I don't know. I'm torn. No, shredded, over this issue.

    I just watched my mother die in November at the age of 85 of Alzheimer's. My older sisters , who were the decision makers, decided to choose palliative care. Unbeknownst to me at the start, that included no food or even fluids (no i.v.) when she could no longer swallow. The doctor claimed that she was so far gone that her body was at the stage where she no longer needs it or feels it. This was B.S. in my opinion. I watched her die painfully, grasping with her hands at the air, struggling, & trying to talk, but could not. This went on for four days before she finally passed.

    So on one hand, I do believe strongly that if someone, in their right mind, has a terminal illness and are suffering, they should absolutely have a right to choose. On the other, I can't help but think of the doctor who proclaimed that my mother could not feel anymore. A lot of times, I feel that doctors are simply guessing, and ultimately these are the people who make the decisions. They are the best we've got, but I'm just not sure we are far enough along in the medical field for them to decide these things. :(
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2016
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Japchae

    Japchae Very Tilted

    Your palliative care people are disgusting human beings. Palliative care, by nature, is comfort care. As opposed to curative. IV fluids are not curative, they are comfort in most cases. I worked in hospice and Palliative care for 7.5 years. Fluids could be advocated for when it was related to the patient's comfort. To deny them that is inhumane. I'm sorry for your experience.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize. Donor

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    Both my FIL & MIL were under hospice care and had IV fluids to keep their bodies from painful dehydration.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. Charlatan

    Charlatan sous les pavés, la plage

    Location:
    Temasek
    Interesting and important part to add to this discussion. Palliative and hospice care.

    It's one thing to talk about the right end your life, it's also important to talk about the quality of your life as it ends.

    This is mostly paid for by our Universal health care in Canada (though the rules differ from province to province).
     
    • Like Like x 2
  18. genuinemommy

    genuinemommy Moderator Staff Member

    The last word we heard my mom speak was "water". She didn't have an IV. I doubt she wanted to be stuck by another needle, but she was capable of swallowing small amounts of water even after she no longer wanted to eat. She went fast, though. Within minutes of her doc's last visit where she told us we had at least a week. She died in hospice care at home. Hospice helped us cope with her rapid deterioration and sudden death.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2016
    • Like Like x 1
  19. omega

    omega Very Tilted

    I wrote pretty extensively in tfp 4.0 about my mother's last week at home with all of us waiting for her to die, as it happened. We did not give her food or water, as she was already in a coma. I believe it was the right thing to do. She still took a week to die after going unconscious.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize. Donor

    Location:
    Large City, TX