1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
Dismiss Notice
Hey Guest!
The donation button is here.
https://goo.gl/aFggcs
Dismiss Notice
Guest, some new updates and fixes were done. Please let staff know if anything is funky or wonky!!!

first handgun

Discussion in 'Tilted Weaponry' started by ralphie250, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. oldtimer56

    oldtimer56 umime

    Location:
    East Texas
    Mine was a S&W Model 27 with a 4" barrel, .357 mag. Wish I still had it, but after close to 10K rounds when thru it, it was getting loose.
     
  2. ralphie250

    ralphie250 Fully Erect Donor

    still looking.
     
  3. ChrisJericho

    ChrisJericho Careless whisper

    Location:
    Fraggle Rock
    Why? Just get the glock 17 or 19.
     
  4. buzzgunner

    buzzgunner 180 gr. of diplomacy

    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    Ralphie, it's hard to go wrong with a Glock. My wife and I both use them as our primary CHL guns (hers is a G19, which is chambered in 9mm. Ming is a G23, which is chambered in .40 S&W.) About the only thing that might legitimately prevent you from happily owning a Glock is that they have a somewhat boxy frame which can prevent a lot of folks (especially those with smaller hands) from achieving a solid comfortable grip (which, of course, is essential to accurate shooting.) Sticking with 9mm, another gun that I might recommend is the Sig Sauer P320. It's accurate, reliable, and ergonomically friendly. It's also relatively easy to maintain (field stripping and reassembly are fairly simple.)
     
  5. ralphie250

    ralphie250 Fully Erect Donor

    I herd that glocks are made with plastic parts. not sure if I like that idea
     
  6. buzzgunner

    buzzgunner 180 gr. of diplomacy

    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    Almost ALL modern semi-auto handguns are made with some polymer components. Glock just popularized the idea first. Non-metal components have a number of advantages over the same parts made from metal. Polymer parts reduce the overall weight of the firearm (which generally improves handling and reduces fatigue), they frequently reduce the purchase price of the gun, and they allow the gun to flex better (in those areas where flex is desirable.) There is no data to suggest firearms with polymer components suffer from reduced accuracy, reliability, or overall product life (the big three.) This last sentence applies mainly to what most consider "name brand" firearms. The same cannot be said for knock-off or entry-level brands.

    You can find all alloy handguns for sale, but you'll be surprised how few there are compared to alloy/polymer combination designs. If at all possible, I'd encourage you to find a friend who owns one or more of the handgun types that you think you might be buying and have him/her take you to the range. The results might surprise you!