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Grammar Gripes and Other Psycholinguistic Squawkings

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by Baraka_Guru, Aug 6, 2011.

  1. snowy

    snowy so kawaii Staff Member

    I'd rather just say, "Fuck you."
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. DAKA

    DAKA DOING VERY NICELY, THANK YOU Donor

    I agree, it sounds like a "fuck you"...
     
  3. redravin

    redravin Cynical Optimist Donor

    Location:
    North
    The one that drives me nuts is thanking me for something I haven't done.
    If I wanted to do it, your blatant assumption kinda put me off the game there pal.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    Oh the ol' "please and thank you".... I've hated that for years. It screams of entitlement and/or ingratitude.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    The word you're looking for isn't "learnings," it's lessons.
     
  6. snowy

    snowy so kawaii Staff Member

    I'm-a gonna teach you a learnin'.
     
  7. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    I'm sure you have many learnings to teach.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member Donor

    Location:
    Nebraska
    After several visits to fast food joints, an acquaintance of mine, recently arrived from Latvia, thinks that the phrase "THANK YOU" means "place trash here."
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. Speed_Gibson

    Speed_Gibson Hacking the Gibson

    Location:
    Wolf 359
    Ain't nuttin' wrong with that, is there? Sometimes people loose* their way where they are going to.

    *Yes that entire string is cringe worthy, but particular misuse really irritates me (up there with ending a sentence in a preposition) and is something I see frequently. It is not even a bloody homonym.
     
  10. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    That one's more common than it should be.

    This is the sort of English up with which I will not put!

    We may have covered this in this thread already, but....

    Grammar myths #1: is it wrong to end a sentence with a preposition? | OxfordWords blog
     
    • Like Like x 2
  11. Speed_Gibson

    Speed_Gibson Hacking the Gibson

    Location:
    Wolf 359
    That was interesting. I try to avoid that if possible as it sounds wrong to me and just awkward, but yes as this clip shows there are times you sound even more awkward avoiding it.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    I'm amazed at how often I see the word university capitalized when applied in a general sense, e.g., "I graduated University," or, "I'll meet you at the University," or "I'm in my final year of University."

    It's like people capitalize it to suggest how lofty it is. University is the height of formal education, right? I mean, one goes to college, but one goes to University.

    It's like when people say they utilize something instead of use it. It sounds more important with the fancier word, right?
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2014
    • Like Like x 2
  13. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize.

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    "I still haven't found what I'm looking for."

    V.

    I still haven't found that for which I'm looking.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Fangirl

    Fangirl Very Tilted

    Location:
    Arizona
    Hm. Assuming you refer to usage both in Canada and the United States?
    What comes to mind is: In conversation, eastern Canadians refer to college and university as distinct entities. In casual conversation here in the States, the two words are interchangeable, as in, "My son just left for college" and, "My son just left for university."
    In eastern Canada, going to college and going to university are two different things. I get the impression it is more impressive-sounding to go to university so perhaps that capitalization thing is part of the perceived cachet?
     
  15. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    I think the U.S. confuses much of the world with their post-secondary system.

    In this part of Canada (at least), colleges are distinct from universities. This is why you also have "university colleges," institutions that grant university degrees or are college-level institutions of a university. Many of them are simply colleges that don't have full university status, whether or not they are a part of a larger university.

    Maybe it's just me, by when I hear "diploma," I think college or a certificate program through a university. When I hear "degree," I think university.
     
  16. Fangirl

    Fangirl Very Tilted

    Location:
    Arizona
    Interesting! We have "community colleges" from which one can get a 2-year degree or other certificate of competence (like X-ray tech) or you can accumulate about 2 years of credit hours and transfer to a university, where you would continue, getting a university degree.

    I like differentiating college and university with diploma and degree. Mostly though, I hear the word "diploma" used in reference to high school.
     
  17. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    For the record, I earned a three-year diploma from a community college and applied transfer credits to get about one year's worth towards a four-year (honours) university degree.
     
  18. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member Donor

    Location:
    Nebraska
    Where I was raised, in provincial Kansas, you went away to college, or went away to "the university," but "the university" could mean any university, not a particular one. In my case it was Emporia State University, and I felt that I got a good, if not prestigious, education and degree. To this day phrases like "going to university" or "graduating university" just sound kind of awkward without the definite article. And I'm aware that this is probably just a provincial usage.

    When I hear diploma, I think of high school, a trade school, or a community college. A four year program is a "degree," in American usage. But a degree from a "prestigious" COLLEGE (like CCNY, Dartmouth College, or Boston College would trump one from a "podunk" university, like Emporia State, Dakota Wesleyan, and hundreds more.
    --- merged: Sep 25, 2014 at 5:49 PM ---
    Should it not be "I still haven't found that for which I have been looking?"
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 2, 2014
    • Like Like x 1
  19. Speed_Gibson

    Speed_Gibson Hacking the Gibson

    Location:
    Wolf 359
    Just heard on a commercial that aired during the Chopped Champions Finale - the classic "Doorbuster" they use for sales. That one is painful to my ears.
     
  20. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize.

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    Fiik. In my mind, your 'corrected' line makes it past tense, while the original line & my 'corrected' line are present tense. I that the line should've been "I still don't know what I'm looking for."