1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
Dismiss Notice
Hey Guest!
The donation button is here.
https://goo.gl/aFggcs

Food Introducing yourself to the hot stuff

Discussion in 'Tilted Food' started by Remixer, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    I thought, from your OP, that you wanted to "proceed to a higher level of spiciness." To get there, you have to start eating foods that are too spicy, and work your way up. Somewhat like weightlifting.
    You won't gain anything by dissing the people who are already there.
    Those of us who have been eating hot or spicy (the two words do not mean the same thing) our whole lives don't feel them the same way you do.
    And Tabasco is NOT particularly hot, as hot sauces go. Also, too vinegary for my taste.

    Lindy
     
  2. Remixer

    Remixer Middle Eastern Doofus Donor

    Location:
    Frankfurt, Germany
    What's with the condescending tone of your response?

    Regardless, you certainly don't go for weights that weigh too much...

    I realize my sarcastic remarks and jokes don't always come across properly in text, but goddamn.

    1. I wasn't dissing, I was making a half-hearted remark.

    2. You read my OP right, I want to be able to tolerate more spicy foods and dishes.

    3. My "Yeah, like any of you could that that one either". was referring to the Bhut Jolokia chili. I'm sure you could use one of them, though.

    4. As far as I gathered, most people advised for me to increase the level of spiciness proportionate to my increased tolerance for it.

    5. I thanked everyone for their input. Believe me, without dissing a single one of them.

    6. End of comment.
     
  3. snowy

    snowy so kawaii Staff Member Donor

    I'm half-Dutch. It's the same.
     
  4. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    A couple of days ago, much to my surprise, right here in Lincoln, Nebraska, I found FRESH locally fire-roasted chiles from Hatch NM.:D They had both the mild Anaheim style and another that was a little smaller and kind of medium hot.
    This was at a regular super market, not a Mexican store. Also fresh raw Hatch chiles, right in season.
    This town, which will eventually be my new home, continues to surprise me.:)

    Lindy
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. snowy

    snowy so kawaii Staff Member Donor

    Nom, Hatch chiles are awesome. I saw some at a grocery store here for a while but didn't buy any at the time, and when I went back to get some, they were gone. Next time I'm buying a bunch and making green chile and freezing it.
     
  6. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    I ran across this old thread while looking for something else. @Remixer how is your taste for hot and/or spicy coming along. Are you able to enjoy the hot stuff more now, six and a half years later?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    Sorry for my overly harsh comment. (#21):(
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Remixer

    Remixer Middle Eastern Doofus Donor

    Location:
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Damn, this is an old one. Sorry for being so harsh in return, I've chilled out a lot since then.

    Anyway, my taste for hot & spicy has come along a great deal. Helps that my SO's heritage is Thai/German so I've been having tons of access to spicy foods/dishes these past years and have made sure to take plenty of advantage of this fact.

    I've not really increased my sensitivity (black pepper is still "medium spicy"), so everything is just as spicy now as it was when I started getting into it... but I can "handle" a lot more heat now. I'll be sweating bullets and teeter on the brink of death, sure, but I can't help to do anything other than dive right in. SO has to constantly grab the chilli powder from my hands, and I'm highly addicted to Som Tam now. :D
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    I like to make a distinction between "spicy" and "hot." At least to my taster, food can be strongly flavored with herbs and spices without being hot.

    Spices like rosemary, clove, oregano, basil, bay leaves, allspice, cardamom, cinnamon, mint, anise, paprika, ginger, caraway turmeric, etc. can be overpowering without being really hot. I'm particularly sensitive to rosemary and sage.

    "Hot" refers to chiles (mild to, literally, blistering from capsaicin) black pepper, horseradish, mustard seed, wasabi, and others, etc. where heat takes center stage.

    So, foods can be spicy without much heat (some Italian and Indian dishes) or hot with little or no spices (like kimchi or green chile stew.)
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. fflowley

    fflowley Don't just do something, stand there!

    We're just back from Tucson where we got to enjoy some really nice, delicious hot and spicy foods.
    One that stood out: We ordered Sinaloan hot dogs at a cart and they came with these beautiful whole roasted green chiles. Moderate heat, tasted like they were sprinkled with Adobo during roasting.
    And multiple places we ate with great fresh salsa. So much better than the crap in a jar we usually eat.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    Driving East on I-8 from Tucson we stopped for gas in Lordsburg, NM and there was a local restaurant called Kranberry's right next door. Had a big bowl of Green Chile Stew w/pork and a couple of flour tortillas. $7.00 with free chips and salsa.
    And fresh salsa is so easy to make. Lots of recipes on line.