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Low carb diet blood workup lipid and metabolic panels...

Discussion in 'Tilted Life and Sexuality' started by Lindy, Sep 8, 2011.

  1. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    I've been on a low carb-high protein, high fat regime for a little over five years. I'm usually in a mild state of ketosis. I eat meat or fish nearly every meal. I consume a fair amount of green leafy and cruciferous vegetables, but no white flour, sugar, HFCS, rice, potatoes, corn, etc. Generally under about 40 grams of carbs daily, on average anyway.
    I just started with a new doctor (in my new town) had a very complete physical exam and had a complete blood lab workup. Here's my lab results:

    Total cholesterol is 135. Normal range is 125 to 200
    HDL cholesterol is 46. Normal range is >or=40
    Total Triglycedides is 122. Normal range is <150
    LDL cholesterol is 66. Normal range is <130
    Total chol/HDL chol ratio is 2.9 Normal range is <or=5

    I'm just shy of 35 years old
    Weight is 109
    Blood pressure is 112/72

    My doc said that I must be a really healthy eater to have such good numbers.:) She was somewhat flummoxed when I described my eating regimen, which includes sausage, eggs, steak, cheese, cream, etc. I'm not sure she believed me at first, but after a few minutes of discussion, and looking at the food diary I keep in my purse, she complimented me on being so knowledgeable, and wondered aloud why my RESULTS could be so at odds with what she WAS TAUGHT in medical school twenty five years ago. I told her I thought that was interesting, as well.;)

    I offer this as encouragement to other low carbers, like snowy, telekinetic, and any others on the TFP forum.

    Lindy
     
  2. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    It's good to see that you've got healthy stats.

    However, I don't envy you. I don't think I could maintain your diet. I normally eat at least 40 g of carbs each meal, though few if any of them are white flour, sugar, HFCS, rice, potatoes, corn, etc.

    I guess I'm glad I don't need to eat like you to get within similar ranges. My biggest concern—and this is why I don't think I'd ever eat like you—is the long-term risk factors of such a diet. Don't get me wrong: there are cultures who currently or who have eaten essentially high protein, low carb diets, but not one like yours. I don't know of any traditional diets that consist mainly of a regimen of sausage, eggs, steak, cheese, cream, etc., low carb or not.

    That said, I'd be concerned about such things as micronutrients (I'd take a multivitamin), colon cancer, bone density, etc., and I think a lot of that has to do with the type of food that provides the sources of protein. The traditional Inuit diet, for example, consists of a lot of animal foods that most North Americans don't or wouldn't eat, including organ meats, game meat, various seafood, etc. Consequently, these protein sources are lower in acidity compared to beef, poultry, pork, certain cheeses, etc. But probably more important, these protein sources contain more nutrients, especially when eaten raw.

    Plus there is so much variation between foods that suggets to me that I shouldn't be too caught up on macronutrient values. For example, beef has a similar insulin score to oatmeal and brown pasta, and cheese ranks comparatively to popcorn.

    So many question marks when it comes to nutrition and the human body.

    Either way, I'm certainly not one who would benefit from a low-carb diet, and for that, I'm grateful. I'm actually currently going the other way, as I move towards a more plant-based diet. I tend to choose foods I know are acceptable based on their natural form.

    I can't imagine organizing my diet to ensure I stay in a state such as ketosis. I'd rather pick foods based on their colour variety and wholesomeness.

    In other words, I suppose I commend you but don't envy you—not one bit.
     
  3. fflowley

    fflowley Don't just do something, stand there! Donor

    Lindy I think for many people diet does not have a huge influence on their cholesterol numbers.
    It's largely a function of genetics.

    It would be interesting if you had a prior set of numbers from before your current diet to compare with.
    Do you have any?
    My hunch is that they would not look much different.
     
  4. Remixer

    Remixer Middle Eastern Doofus

    Location:
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Hmm....

    Truth be told, I have not much of an idea what your diet looks like other than some anecdotes that it contains very little carbohydrates, lots of veggies and lots of fat.

    What exactly does your diet look like, Lindy? Any meats? What types of fat? What kinds of vegetables, or any? If carbs, in what form? Quantities of each of the mentioned types of food?

    Cheers
     
  5. snowy

    snowy so kawaii Staff Member

    My diet right now is incredibly plant-based. Low-carb, but plant-based. It's insane. I eat about 3 servings of vegetables at every meal. It helps that it's late summer and our garden is exploding.

    Generally, I'm just more aware of what I would normally eat that would go on bread--there's no reason it can't go on spinach instead. Even if I'm not eating low-carb, I think that's a lesson everyone could use. Bread tends to be one of the most highly processed things we eat. Whole foods in general are better.
     
  6. Remixer

    Remixer Middle Eastern Doofus

    Location:
    Frankfurt, Germany
    That's a curious finding you made there, snowy.

    I've always wanted to taste the combination of Nutella and spinach; or banana slices and strawberry jam on a leaf of iceberg lettuce; or a blueberry jam/balsamico "vinaigrette" on rocket salad mixed with black pepper.

    Yum!
     
  7. Lindy

    Lindy Moderator Staff Member

    Location:
    Nebraska
    Well, you eat a "controlled carb" diet. This is what the Atkins diet is in maintenance stage. And compared to a typical American (or Canadian) diet, your regime IS low carb. And absent starches, you can eat A LOT of veggies and fruit to get up to 40+ grams PER MEAL. I eat quite a few on 40 grams PER DAY.

    Read my post. I never said mainly. I just said that my diet INCLUDED those food items.

    That said, I'd be concerned about such things as micronutrients (I'd take a multivitamin),
    I do take a multivitamin w/iron, potasium, magnesium, and a couple of others.
    colon cancer, bone density, etc., and I think a lot of that has to do with the type of food that provides the sources of protein. The traditional Inuit diet, for example, consists of a lot of animal foods that most North Americans don't or wouldn't eat, including organ meats, game meat, various seafood, etc.
    I do eat those things, as well as grass fed beef and bison.
    Consequently, these protein sources are lower in acidity compared to beef, poultry, pork, certain cheeses, etc. But probably more important, these protein sources contain more nutrients, especially when eaten raw.
    Do ceviche and rare beef count?

    Plus there is so much variation between foods that suggets to me that I shouldn't be too caught up on macronutrient values. For example, beef has a similar insulin score to oatmeal and brown pasta, and cheese ranks comparatively to popcorn.
    I'll have to read up on "insulin score" -I know little about it.

    So many question marks when it comes to nutrition and the human body.
    Truly!

    Either way, I'm certainly not one who would benefit from a low-carb diet, and for that, I'm grateful. I'm actually currently going the other way, as I move towards a more plant-based diet. I tend to choose foods I know are acceptable based on their natural form.

    I can't imagine organizing my diet to ensure I stay in a state such as ketosis. I'd rather pick foods based on their colour variety and wholesomeness. I don't choose foods with the goal of staying in ketosis. A mild state of ketosis is the result of what I choose to eat. Many people are in a mild state of ketosis for part of the night until they eat breakfast.
    In other words, I suppose I commend you but don't envy you—not one bit.[/quote]
    I didn't ask for either commendation or envy. I just tossed out some numbers to show that a low carb diet is perhaps not the dangerous thing that some folks were taught that it is.

    Lindy
     
  8. snowy

    snowy so kawaii Staff Member

    Blueberry vinaigrette actually goes quite well with rocket (arugula for our American audience).
     
  9. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    Don't get me wrong. I said I eat at least 40 grams per meal. This also includes snacks. I can easily eat as much as 300 g and sometimes 400 g of carbs in a day. And I do happen to eat a lot of that as whole grains (bread, cereal, etc.) and legumes, especially for the protein they also carry.

    And while I said I don't eat that much rice or potatoes, I do on occasion. And while I don't eat that much sweet corn, I do like to eat baked unsalted tortilla chips and unsalted popcorn as snacks, rather than eat it as the typical sweet corn that is found everywhere. Corn isn't really all that bad, especially popcorn. I think people tend to look at the highly processed products and write off the entire food. Okay, so don't eat Corn Flakes and HFCS. Corn has shown to actually be good for your blood sugar, as opposed to the contrary. Actually, the American Diabetes Association lists popcorn among the "best choices" for whole grain food.

    I also eat a lot of fruit. At least four servings a day, I think.

    The only carbs I'm controlling is in variety, not amount. I don't like empty calories; I prefer whole foods. Actually, it would be more accurate to say that I control protein and fat, because that's how I build my meals/snacks. I aim for a minimum amount of protein and fat, and then use carbs as a filler to get the level of satiety I want. Depending on my activity level, this could mean a lot. I tend to view carbs as a "flexible" source of calories, as it makes up a majority of my caloric intake: at least 50% but probably as much as 60, or 70%.

    Wow, I thought that my response had enough evidence that I did indeed read your post. When you say you "eat meat or fish nearly every meal" and only eat "a fair amount" of two types of vegetables—no more than what 40 carbs/day will allow—and then go on to say your eating regimen "includes sausage, eggs, steak, cheese, cream, etc.," what am I supposed to derive from that? I can only assume you're petit based on your weight, so I guess I could assume your caloric requirements are low. But you didn't really give us any accurate picture; you listed a bunch of animal products (only some of which is fish) built around some greenery. It's not like you scanned your food diary for us or anything. Cut me some slack please? If only 40 g of carbs get into you each day, what is your balance of food looking like, then?

    I totally read your post, but it didn't really paint a clear picture. I mean, many people eat sausage, eggs, steak, cheese, and cream and aren't overweight. Some have a low body fat percentage, and are athletes.

    What does your diet look like, really?

    I think most people in North America are at least mildly magnesium deficient, but I think if you're eating a lot of leafy greens, supplementation wouldn't be as necessary. The multivitamin is a good idea though. I take one too, though without the iron for obvious reasons.

    I think between that and the fish, you probably do well enough to balance things out. It all depends on how much dairy, pork, etc., you consume.

    I'm not sure, as far as what I was referring to. I don't think so. I was referring to game meat and organ meat (brains, etc.), which will have vitamin C and higher concentrations of other nutrients if they're eaten raw.

    It's worth looking into. In examining food and how it works, I've taken on a pretty stable philosophy that suggests I shouldn't be concerned about protein, fat, or carbs on any individual restrictive basis. I should be concerned about a) balance and b) good choices. For example, you're far better off eating unsalted popcorn than you are baked goods. That's why diabetics are okay with eating a reasonable serving of popcorn but should stay away from most baked goods.

    I suppose I should simply say, then, that I'd like to avoid ketosis.

    I think in most cases, people don't actually ask for these things; they normally come unsolicited. I could be wrong. :p
     
  10. Remixer

    Remixer Middle Eastern Doofus

    Location:
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Honestly, while I was making fun of the idea in my first response, the idea of those combinations doesn't strike me as odd or as something to avoid.

    Not after I've had roasted blueberries in their own jus together with an original German Schnitzel, or the time I had a creamy vanilla pudding with raw corn kernels inside, and found both dishes delicious.

    EDIT: Or the time I had fresh Takoyaki topped with Tonkatsu sauce, Bonito flakes and grilled slices of papaya.