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TFP 2016 Updated!

What books are you reading right now?

Discussion in 'Tilted Art, Photography, Music & Literature' started by sapiens, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize.

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    I'm now halfway through Vanity Fair, and I'm about to start The Help by Kathryn Stockett.
     
  2. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize.

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    I can now say, honestly, that I have read Vanity Fair all the way through, although I did slim read some of the blah blah blah passages.

    Of course that might lead to the question:

    "Why?"
     
  3. cynthetiq

    cynthetiq Administrator Staff Member Donor

    Location:
    New York City
  4. redux

    redux Very Tilted Donor

    Location:
    Foggy Bottom
  5. cynthetiq

    cynthetiq Administrator Staff Member Donor

    Location:
    New York City
  6. rogue49

    rogue49 Tech Kung Fu Artist Staff Member Donor

    Location:
    Baltimore/DC
    Jerusalem by Alan Moore

    A "light read" (~1300 pgs)

    I'm going to do battle with it, quite literally...the hefty thing could be a sledgehammer.

    I often say, "everything counts"...I think Mr. Moore took me at my word and wrote a book about it.
    At least, that's what the reviewers say...
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2016
  7. *Nikki*

    *Nikki* Getting Tilted

    Location:
    South Carolina
    I read these as a teen and just started the 6 book series again.[​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
     
    Chris Noyb likes this.
  8. Baraka_Guru

    Baraka_Guru Möderätor Staff Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    I'm reading David Eddings' Magician's Gambit (Book 3 of the Belgariad). It's repetitive, cheesy, and boring—obviously a product of its time. It's an easy read, which is nice while I weather this cold, but after the two books before it, I'm getting tired of the series.
     
  9. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize.

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    I tried a light read, just for giggles, but gave up at page 30:

    My Friend Flicka.
     
  10. redravin

    redravin Cynical Optimist Donor

    Location:
    North

    I read that when I was a kid.
    It didn't make much of a dent but I do remember The Black Stallion, Misty of Chincoteague, Black Beauty, King of the Wind, and dozens of other horse books that were in my mothers library from when she was a little girl.
    What is it about girls and loving horses?
     
    Chris Noyb and Japchae like this.
  11. Japchae

    Japchae Very Tilted

    I love this series. I have them all.

    Edit: I just looked again and laughed because every single paperback has the spine all broken to shit from being read so many times since high school.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2016
  12. Lindy

    Lindy Very Tilted Donor

    Location:
    Nebraska
    I grew up with horses on the farm, probably started riding about age four or five. I still like to ride whenever I have a chance.:)
     
  13. Japchae

    Japchae Very Tilted

    I've also read all of those. The whole Misty series and 80% of what Walter Farley wrote. Horses, when you're a young girl, are all about freedom, the power of nature, connection with a beast, and the largest, friendly animal you can be in contact with without fearing for your life. After you've ridden one as a small child, nothing compares. It's been at least a dozen years, but I can still smell and feel live horse flesh against my cheek.
     
    Lindy likes this.
  14. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize.

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    I read the series a couple of years ago. It took some time, but I managed to collect all six books in hardback for around $8.00.
     
    cynthetiq likes this.
  15. cynthetiq

    cynthetiq Administrator Staff Member Donor

    Location:
    New York City
    I just set my Goodreads Reading Challenge 2017 today.

    I hit 25 books last year. I'm aiming to do at least the same again this year.

    [​IMG]
    2017 Reading Challenge
     
    CinnamonGirl likes this.
  16. CinnamonGirl

    CinnamonGirl Growing Strong Donor

    Finished up The Things We Wish Were True, by Marybeth Mayhew Whalen. Pretty good. Small-town life, near-tragedy that brings neighbors together, some drama with said neighbors. Different point-of-view each chapter, which I like.

    Immediately started Rise of the Rocket Girls, by Nathalia Holt. Already has me daydreaming about where I could've gone if I'd been serious about college, and realized much earlier in my life how much I liked math.
     
    Chris Noyb likes this.
  17. redux

    redux Very Tilted Donor

    Location:
    Foggy Bottom
    I read this several months ago and was enlightened and entertained to learn about those little known women "computers" and the significant role they played at JPL before and during the early days of NASA.

    There is a good article and author interview in Smithsonian Magazine.
     
    CinnamonGirl and Chris Noyb like this.
  18. Chris Noyb

    Chris Noyb Get in, buckle up, hang on, & don't criticize.

    Location:
    Large City, TX
    Is the new NASA movie--sorry, the name escapes me--based on ROTRG?
     
  19. redux

    redux Very Tilted Donor

    Location:
    Foggy Bottom
    Same time frame, different women.

    The movie, Hidden Figures, is about the Black women "computers" at the NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia.
     
    Fangirl, CinnamonGirl and Chris Noyb like this.
  20. Borla

    Borla Moderator Staff Member Donor

    Just finished Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance.

    It was a relatively easy read (less than 300 pages), but I found it very interesting. It is essentially a memoir of a family that had roots in Appalachian Kentucky, migrated to Middletown, OH (I know we have some TFPers who've lived in/near that area?) for jobs at the steel mill (now AK Steel), and how the culture of poor, white, Scots-Irish Appalachia impacted their family, lifestyle, and relationships. It's told through the eyes of the author, whose grandparents migrated from Jackson, KY to OH, and who ended up as a Yale law grad, very much breaking the mold of dysfunction he grew up in.

    As someone who grew up in an area not terribly unlike Middletown, and whose extended family had many of the same dysfunctions as the author (though I thankfully wasn't raised as much in the middle of it as he was), I found some things really hit home. Other things I could relate to pretty easily, or had seen first hand. I'd recommend it for anyone raised around a similar background. Though it isn't the overall theme of the book, there are some interesting conclusions mentioned at times by the author of how similar the challenges are between poor blacks and poor whites in the US. It's something you could read in a weekend if you are interested. It actually has motivated me to read another book that popped up on Amazon as related, which I'm starting now, called White Trash. The 400 Year Untold History of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg.
     
    Fangirl, CinnamonGirl and Chris Noyb like this.